Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 7)

Loving Eleanor by Susan Wittig Albert
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"This warm, extensively researched novel will entrance readers and inspire them to look further into the lives of two extraordinary women."
New York Times bestselling author Albert (The Darling Dahlias and the Silver Dollar Bush, 2015, etc.) returns to historical fiction in this intimate exploration of the relationship between Eleanor Roosevelt and journalist Lorena Hickok. Read full book review >
FORSAKEN by Ross Howell Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"A fast-paced if uneven depiction of racial injustice in the segregated South."
After a 16-year-old black girl is convicted of killing her employer in 1912 Virginia, a young white journalist becomes embroiled in the aftermath. Read full book review >

THE TIME THE WATERS ROSE by Paul Ruffin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"These stories exploring how life on the water affects everyday people make for amiable reading, but they become most compelling when Ruffin taps into the bleaker impulses found below a more cordial facade."
In Ruffin's new collection, men, boats, and bodies of water collide unexpectedly, with results that are often humorous, violent, or both. Read full book review >
THE CIGAR FACTORY by Michele Moore
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"High quality historical fiction."
A first novel by a Southerner from a Southern university press with an introduction by a Southern writer and preceded by a glossary, a bibliography, and a note on the Gullah-Geechee dialect of the Southeast suggests that what follows will be an educational experience, but it turns out to be a good read. Read full book review >
The Wrong Road Home by Ian A. O'Connor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 31, 2016

"An intimate look at a life lived as a lie."
In this historical novel based on a true story, a man operates as a doctor in both the United States and Ireland, despite having only a GED and a handful of forged credentials. Read full book review >

DETECTIVE FICTION by William Wells
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 2016

"Waggish Jack is good company, and he's appealingly aware of how deeply unoriginal a vehicle Wells (Ride Away Home, 2014) has given him. Maybe next year."
A Chicago cop retired to Fort Myers Beach lands a consulting contract with a neighboring police force that's a pipe dream from the first puff to the last. Read full book review >
THE BULGARIAN TRUCK by Dumitru Tsepeneag
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 29, 2016

"An imaginative work of oneiric fiction by a master practitioner that may prove a bit too fantastic for many audiences."
A Romanian writer chronicles the writing of a novel about a truck driver. Read full book review >
I SAW HER THAT NIGHT by Drago Jancar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 29, 2016

"The economy with which Jancar creates memorable characters and moments while never letting the reader forget the war, the tumult of Yugoslavia, or the incursion of communism is astonishing, especially compared with the U.S. vogue for mammoth tomes of modest scope."
Five people in the Balkans recall their lives before and during World War II and the one unusual woman they all knew in this quietly impressive tale by a leading Slovenian writer. Read full book review >
The Sins of Soldiers by S. J. Hardman Lea
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 28, 2016

"A war story that's less about conflict that it is about emotion."
Lea offers a gripping novel about the difficult choices that soldiers face during wartime. Read full book review >
THE SLEEP GARDEN by Jim Krusoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 27, 2016

"From one of our great deadpan absurdists—a new member of the club to which George Saunders, Robert Coover, and Stanley Elkin belong—comes a book of unearthly delights that will have you, too, wondering nervously what that incessant grinding sound is."
In Krusoe's latest surreal effort, a collection of oddballs living in (and never leaving) a strange underground apartment called the Burrow grapple with life's—and the afterlife's—mysteries. Read full book review >
ALL THE BIRDS IN THE SKY by Charlie Jane Anders
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"Reminiscent of the best of Jo Walton and Nina Kiriki Hoffman."
Will science or magic save our world and all the living beings on it? That's the question posed in this science fantasy love story by the editor-in-chief of online geek mecca io9.com (Choir Boy, 2005).Read full book review >
THE BANDS OF MOURNING by Brandon Sanderson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"A fast-paced novel that's part Wild West, part Indiana Jones, and wholly entertaining, combining high emotional stakes with a deep, good-natured sense of humor."
A fantasy adventure about a race to discover, and control, magical artifacts of immense power. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >