Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 7)

WE ARE OKAY by Nina LaCour
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An elegantly crafted paean to the cleansing power of truth. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
"If only lonely were a more accurate word. It should sound much less pretty." Read full book review >
THE CHILBURY LADIES' CHOIR by Jennifer Ryan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Mildly entertaining, Ryan's debut novel seems overfamiliar and too intent on warming the heart."
While their men are off fighting the Nazis, the women in the English village of Chilbury struggle to carry on. Read full book review >

THE BLUE HOUR by Laura Pritchett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An original meditation on sex, love, and death."
One man's death sends wide shock waves across a Colorado community. Read full book review >
THE DARK FLOOD RISES by Margaret Drabble
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"The lack of narrative drive may irk some readers, but those who appreciate her able combination of intelligence, wit, and rue will willingly follow Drabble into the sunset."
From veteran novelist Drabble (The Pure Gold Baby, 2013, etc.), a meditation on modern old age spiked with astringent humor on a subject "too serious for tears." Read full book review >
AMERICAN STREET by Ibi Zoboi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This book will take root in readers' hearts. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Fabiola Toussaint is a black immigrant girl whose life is flipped upside down when she moves to Detroit, Michigan, from her homeland of Haiti and her mother is detained by ICE, leaving her to go on alone. Read full book review >

ONES AND ZEROES by Dan Wells
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A high-tech, futuristic Ocean's Eleven with teens. (Science fiction. 14 & up)"
Do you matter? Are you a one or a zero? Read full book review >
THE LAST OF AUGUST by Brittany Cavallaro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This muddled mystery rests on elaborate machinations with disproportionate motivations, but the emotional odyssey should satisfy readers seeking a contemporary, teenage take on the Baker Street pair. (Mystery. 14 & up)"
A duo becomes a trio and tries to settle family feuds in this relationship-focused crime caper sequel to A Study in Charlotte (2016). Read full book review >
PIECING ME TOGETHER by Renée Watson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A timely, nuanced, and unforgettable story about the power of art, community, and friendship. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Sixteen-year-old Jade dreams of success beyond her neighborhood despite the prejudices that surround her. Read full book review >
SHADOWBAHN by Steve Erickson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Think Philip K. Dick on smoother acid and with a more up-to-date soundtrack, and you've got something of this eminently strange, thoroughly excellent book."
The sleep of reason produces monsters, said Goya—including monsters of architecture and history that meet, most uneasily, in the pages of Erickson's (These Dreams of You, 2012, etc.) latest. Read full book review >
THE DARK AND OTHER LOVE STORIES by Deborah Willis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"These are low-key stories of great acuity, precision, and poignancy."
Canadian story-writer Willis' second collection, following Vanishing and Other Stories (2010), confirms her debut's promise and extends its range. Read full book review >
ON TURPENTINE LANE by Elinor Lipman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Warm, clever, a little silly, a lot of fun."
A professional thank-you-note writer buys a house with a past and gets more than she bargained for. Read full book review >
The Mermaids of Lake Michigan by Suzanne Kamata
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A lyrical, compelling coming-of-age story with magical elements."
A water-loving girl struggles to find her place on land in this novel. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >