Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 8)

ODESSA SEA by Clive Cussler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"Sketch out some exotic, ephemeral settings, make every villain as nasty as possible, and it's another of Cussler's cinematic-style entertainments spinning out at hold-on-to-your-hat speed."
Cussler's conglomerate (Built to Thrill, 2016, etc.) gives fans their money's worth with 500 pages chronicling Dirk Pitt's Black Sea adventures while hopscotching back to the Russian Revolution, then up to today's Iranian quest for nuclear weapons, and throwing in a rogue terror attack on the United States for good measure. Read full book review >
THE SLEEPING BEAUTY KILLER by Mary Higgins Clark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"Fleet, conscientious, and utterly true to its carefully wrought formula."
Laurie Moran and the staff of Under Suspicion reopen a cold case almost everyone else is convinced was closed tight 15 years ago. Read full book review >

THE SPY by Paulo Coelho
by Paulo Coelho, translated by Zoë Perry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A sympathetic but sketchy portrait of a legend."
Coelho's (Adultery, 2014, etc.) novel about Mata Hari, the notorious and (in all likelihood) falsely accused World War I spy, hews closely to the facts. Read full book review >
IN PLAIN VIEW by Julie Shigekuni
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"Like many 'literary' authors before her, Shigekuni borrows genre-fiction tropes without knowing how to make them work."
A thriller that takes the reader from academia in Los Angeles to the nuclear disaster at Fukushima. Read full book review >
Criminal Zoo by Sean McDaniel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A penetrating look inside a killer's head; disquieting but insightful."
A debut thriller tells the story of a killer imprisoned in a facility that may be more barbaric than the atrocities he's committed. Read full book review >

NINEVEH by Henrietta Rose-Innes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A persuasive, witty exploration of a tough and unconventional young woman—and a consistently lively account of the entanglements of cultural politics, class, and architecture in contemporary South Africa."
White South African writer Rose-Innes makes her American debut with a nimble, intriguing novel about a second-generation Cape Town exterminator—er, ethical pest-removal specialist. Read full book review >
SCHLUMP by Hans Herbert Grimm
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"Not quite the equal of The Good Soldier Schweick but still a welcome contribution to the literature of the Great War and its discontents."
A lost classic of anti-war literature is revived in a fresh, vigorous translation. Read full book review >
THE DISPOSSESSED by Szilard Borbely
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"An exquisite addition to any library of the dark, the bleak, and the absurd, Borbély's inauguration into English is a magnificent one."
In his first and only novel, Borbély describes growing up in a remote village in northeastern Hungary. Read full book review >
RULER OF THE NIGHT by David Morrell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"Richly detailed and engrossing; Morrell animates the Victorian era and delivers genre thrills with rare style and panache."
Railroaded in Victorian England. Read full book review >
TRYSTING by Emmanuelle Pagano
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A sweet and bitter onslaught of love and desire, found and glimpsed, held and lost."
A series of tender little love bites, running the length and depth of all connotations and permutations that the word "love" contains. Read full book review >
THE NEXT ONE WILL KILL YOU by Neil S.  Plakcy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"Not every thread here is equally successful; it's Plakcy's characters, not his plot, that charm."
A rookie FBI agent is determined to show his worth when he's tapped for his very personal connections to Fort Lauderdale's gay community. Read full book review >
THE MUSEUM AT THE END OF THE WORLD by John Metcalf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"Metcalf applies wit, humor, and fine writing to themes of friendship, culture, commitment, and integrity—and all the petty things in life that seek to quash them. This is a book that could restore anyone's faith in the pleasure of reading."
These four related fictions follow a British boy's coming-of-age and his older self enduring a world that rarely lives up to his standards. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >