Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 9)

A VERY BRITISH ENDING by Edward Wilson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Weaving a literary maze of intrigue, betrayal, and deception, Wilson invites justifiable comparison with John le Carré."
Wilson's latest follows William Catesby, high-ranking agent in Great Britain's secret intelligence service, MI6, as he navigates the quicksand of the Cold War's rabid anti-Communist hysteria. Read full book review >
Lost Girls by Merrie Destefano
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A concise, bold crime tale that, even in its darkest moments, shines with brilliance."
In this thriller, a missing teen reappears with amnesia and uncovers a host of parlous secrets buried in her gradually returning memory. Read full book review >

RECLUCE TALES by L.E. Modesitt Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Don't expect great significance everywhere—some of the pieces are no more than vignettes—but Modesitt is excellent company, and the more familiar you are with the series, the richer these stories will seem."
A collection of 17 new and three reprinted stories plus an essay, weaving among the prolific Modesitt's impressive 18-book (and counting) fantasy Saga of Recluse (Heritage of Cyador, 2014, etc.). Read full book review >
THE GIRL FROM OLD NICHOL by Betty Annand
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"What could be an examination of class distinctions in Victorian England disappoints with unrealistic characters and turns of good fortune."
A young girl tries to make her way in the slums of 19th-century London in Annand's debut novel. Read full book review >
CHILD'S PLAY by Merry Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"With a heroine who seems ill-equipped to do her job let alone solve a slew of murders and a thoroughly preposterous plot, this clunker won't thrill suspense fans."
A string of murders points back to a crime committed years earlier by a desperate teenager, forcing his former elementary school teacher to wonder if they're connected to his recent release from prison. Read full book review >

SELECTION DAY by Aravind Adiga
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Incisive and often wickedly funny as social commentary, though many characters are more like caricatures and the finale doesn't resolve much."
A satirical novel set in the author's native Mumbai, where Indian boys from the slums find themselves hot commodities because of their potential in cricket. Read full book review >
AN UNSETTLING CRIME FOR SAMUEL CRADDOCK by Terry Shames
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A favorite of fans who like their police procedurals with a strong ethical center, Shames provides the back story of a Southern cop caught between his job and his culture."
A fire on the wrong side of the tracks starts an investigation that digs as deeply into the crime as it does into the people surrounding it. Read full book review >
THE BORROWED by Chan Ho-kei
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Sprawling and dense, this novel will satisfy your procedural jones, but don't look for more than a cursory reckoning with the troubled history of Hong Kong."
Like Columbo but not funny. Read full book review >
CRIMSON SNOW by Martin Edwards
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Just the thing for readers who crave a retreat from their own rounds of obligatory social events and a rationale assuring them that attending Christmas parties can provide quite a shock to other people's systems."
Indefatigable author/editor Edwards (Serpents in Eden, 2016, etc.), diving once more into the past, dusts off 11 mostly forgotten seasonal reprints from the golden age of the detective story. Read full book review >
LEOPARD AT THE DOOR by Jennifer McVeigh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Readers who want a story that keeps them on edge will enjoy this historical novel rich with emotional and sociopolitical drama."
During the waning years of the British Empire, a young woman returns to her father's Kenyan farm after boarding school in England only to find home is no longer the safe, happy place she recalls. Read full book review >
THE FINAL DAY by William R. Forstchen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"The latest installment in Forstchen's dystopian series will be best enjoyed by those who have read the first two books, One Second After (2009) and One Year After (2015). But with its agreeable protagonist and nicely drawn settings, the novel quickly draws us in."
In the aftermath of an electromagnetic-pulse attack linked to Iran and North Korea that wiped out American cities and led to the installation of an oppressive, unconstitutional government, hard-core patriot John Matherson is called upon to lead the resistance. Read full book review >
FOREIGN SOIL by Maxine Beneba Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A tremendous new voice; a writer of immense talent and depth."
In this aptly named story collection by Clarke (The Hate Race, 2016), an Australian writer of Afro-Caribbean heritage, people living in various countries struggle to build better lives for themselves. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >