Fiction & Literature Book Reviews

THE MONSTER'S DAUGHTER by Michelle Pretorius
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"A promising effort that gets buried under the weight of the past."
A young police officer in modern South Africa investigates a murder with deep roots in the past in Pretorius' debut mystery. Read full book review >
OUTFOXED by David Rosenfelt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"Perhaps the weakest outing for Rosenfelt, who cuts back and forth between his ebullient hero and the nefarious criminals arrayed against him as if waiting in vain for mystery and suspense to break out. There's not even much about dogs."
Dog-loving, work-averse New Jersey attorney Andy Carpenter (Who Let the Dog Out?, 2015, etc.) is dragged back into the courtroom to defend a client who escapes from a minimum security prison hours after hearing that he'll certainly be paroled. Read full book review >

SOVEREIGNTY by Anjenique Hughes
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 19, 2016

"A well-crafted thriller that offers both a warning and hope for the future."
A dystopian sci-fi YA novel about a teenager whose unexpected discoveries hold the promise of a revolution against a totalitarian regime. Read full book review >
REVOLVER by Duane Swierczynski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"Though this novel is dotted with fine details, its ambitious structure gets in the way of narrative momentum."
The murder of two policeman in mid-1960s Philadelphia has reverberations for successive generations of cops in Swierczynski's latest thriller (Canary, 2015, etc.). Read full book review >
YOU'RE THE ONE I WANT by Shane Allison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"Overwrought, overdramatic, overwritten, underedited."
A husband's twin brother and his wife's best friend will go to any lengths to break up the couple. Read full book review >

THE INSEPARABLES by Stuart Nadler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"Love this writer. Love these characters."
Three generations of smart, articulate women deal with challenging life passages. Read full book review >
THE HOPEFULS by Jennifer Close
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"This comedy about political insiders is surprisingly cheerless and weirdly apolitical."
From Close (The Smart One, 2013), a beach read for the election season about the friendship of two women whose husbands work in the Obama White House. Read full book review >
THE IMPERIAL WIFE by Irina Reyn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"The stories of two eras and two marriages are related in evocative language steeped in keenly observed details."
The discovery of a historic Russian artifact kicks off a dual narrative of two women separated by centuries but united in grit and ambition. Read full book review >
THE BAKER STREET JURORS by Michael Robertson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"Robertson, who seems to command an unlimited stream of clever ideas for recycling the Holmes legend without resuscitating the great man, outdoes himself in the most effervescent of his five Baker Street cocktails to date."
It was only a matter of time, and now it's happened at last: Sherlock Holmes gets called to jury duty. Read full book review >
THE HEMINGWAY THIEF by Shaun Harris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"Some thrillers have and some have not. This is one of the latter."
The theft of an original Hemingway manuscript leads to the possible discovery of the author's famous lost briefcase full of stories in this south-of-the-border caper. Read full book review >
FALLING by Jane Green
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"Though Emma's life changes drastically, the reliance on clichés and all-too-familiar tropes makes it difficult to reach an emotional payoff."
Sometimes true love defies all expectations. Read full book review >
THE CASTLE OF KINGS by Oliver Pötzsch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"Combine Princess Bride with Germanic history circa 1500, add a dash of Lord of the Rings, and there's a week of good fun in this 600-page-plus tome."
As the early-16th-century Peasants' War tears Palatinate Germany apart, Pötzsch (The Werewolf of Bamber, 2015, etc.) follows a young noblewoman's epic quest, sparked by a signet ring once owned by the legendary Barbarossa—Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >