Fiction & Literature Book Reviews

HEALING MADDIE BREES by Rebecca Brewster Stevenson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A gorgeous meditation on broken bodies, fractured faith, and the soul-wrenching path to serenity."
As Maddie, a happily married mother of three young boys, faces breast cancer, she and her husband are pulled into the vortex of the past, where long-lost loves and troubled relationships with God collide. Read full book review >
INTIMATIONS by Alexandra Kleeman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"For fans of the avant-garde."
Twelve stories take up a variety of absurdist premises to investigate the meaning of life. Read full book review >

DEATH'S END  by Cixin Liu
Kirkus Star
by Cixin Liu, translated by Ken Liu
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"Liu's trilogy is the first major work of science fiction to come to the West out of China, and it's a masterpiece."
What if alien civilizations do exist? In this final installment of a stunning and provocative trilogy (The Dark Forest, 2015, etc.), Liu teases out the grim, unsettling implications. Read full book review >
DEVIL SENT THE RAIN by Lisa Turner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A well-wrought procedural that takes a hard look at the old South's influence on the new."
A police officer's past relationship with a wealthy family poses problems for a murder case. Read full book review >
BRITISH MANOR MURDER by Leslie Meier
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A peek into British country life provides a nice break, offering enough local color to excuse a rather tepid puzzle."
Counts, countesses, and corpses highlight Lucy Stone's trip across the pond. Read full book review >

THE MURDER OF A QUEEN BEE  by Meera Lester
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"The second from Lester (A Beeline To Murder, 2016) is long on romance, sweet tips, and honey recipes. There's a thin little mystery, too."
A beekeeper gets a second chance at love and solving a murder. Read full book review >
SHOOT 'EM UP by Janey Mack
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Without more information about the book's context, the heroine's full personality doesn't shine; readers will have to focus more than they should on trying to piece together her back story."
A scrappy Chicago cop seeks her own personal justice when her brother is shot. Read full book review >
A DEADLY THAW by Sarah Ward
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"The second from Ward (In Bitter Chill, 2015) in an excellent police procedural that shows how psychological damage from the past casts shadows over the present."
The present always owes a debt to the past. Read full book review >
A TASTE OF BLOOD AND ASHES by Jaden Terrell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 21, 2016

"After a tense prologue, Terrell settles into a relaxed rhythm that allows all the complications you'd want from a 40-year-old conspiracy without ever breaking a sweat."
A suspicious fire that claims two of a trainer's 14 horses opens the gate to a long list of felonies past and present. Read full book review >
DAISY IN CHAINS by Sharon Bolton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"No detail should be missed, no nuance overlooked in Bolton's chilling tale of a master manipulator who leaves nothing to chance."
A serial killer bids for freedom with the aid of an unconventional lawyer. Read full book review >
PUSHING UP DAISIES by M.C. Beaton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"Fans of this long-running series will enjoy the continuing drama of the private eye's romances, which, as so often before (Dishing The Dirt, 2016, etc.), overshadow the mystery."
Agatha Raisin continues to struggle, though not very hard, against her predilection for unsuitable men. Read full book review >
BELOVED POISON by Elaine Thomson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2016

"A debut mystery chock full of mysterious doings, riveting historical detail, and so many horrifying anecdotes about the state of medicine in the mid-1800s that you can almost feel the evil miasma rising from the pages."
The coming demolition of St. Saviour's Infirmary in Victorian London marks a decisive chapter for a young woman who's lived her entire life there as a man. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >