Food & Cooking Book Reviews

MY FAT DAD by Dawn Lerman
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Laced with love, family dramas, recipes, and the pangs of growing up, Lerman's memoir is a satisfying treat."
Nutrition expert and New York TimesWell Blog contributor Lerman pens an intimate memoir about the intersections of intense family relationships and food, dieting, and healthy eating.Read full book review >
CHILLED by Tom Jackson
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"There's much to wonder at in Jackson's captivating book."
The lively history of refrigeration from British science writer Jackson (Mathematics: An Illustrated History of Numbers, 2012, etc.).Read full book review >

HOW TO COOK A MOOSE by Kate Christensen
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"A warmly engaging culinary memoir."
An award-winning novelist's account of the unexpected fulfillment she found in New England, living, loving, cooking, and eating "at the end of the world." Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A disarmingly candid look at the highs, lows, and true grit of a culinary star."
From the acclaimed first female Iron Chef, a heartfelt memoir of a loving family, a passion for food, and the challenges of career and personal life. Read full book review >
AMERICAN WINE by Tom Acitelli
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A tasty combination of commercial and culinary history reflecting the maturations of the wine business and Americans' taste buds."
In an appropriate follow-up to The Audacity of Hops: The History of America's Craft Beer Revolution (2013), Curbed Boston founding editor Acitelli wades into the colorful history of American fine wine, showing how, in 2014, the United States surpassed France to become the largest wine market in the world.Read full book review >

VORACIOUS by Cara Nicoletti
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"All in all, a pleasure for hungry readers."
An exploration of "the profound connection between eating and reading." Read full book review >
Recipes for Redemption by Carole Bumpus
Released: Aug. 15, 2015

"An interesting survey of traditional regional French cooking for intermediate to advanced cooks and fans of Bumpus' novel."
This companion cookbook to Bumpus' novel, A Cup of Redemption (2014), provides recipes for traditional, rural French cooking, region by region. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"A well-researched effort that will undoubtedly add to general readers' knowledge about the food they consume on a daily basis."
Veteran food journalist Marx de Salcedo delves into a previously obscure organization in the Boston suburbs that influences perhaps half the items for sale in supermarkets. Read full book review >
DRIVING HUNGRY by Layne Mosler
Released: July 14, 2015

"Mosler's lively and accessible writing style joyfully captures the satisfaction gained by trusting your instincts and seeking out new places, food, and people."
Building on the success of her blog, Taxi Gourmet, Mosler recounts the story of her transcontinental search for a vocation, which propelled the author into dancing in tango clubs in Buenos Aires, becoming a cab driver in New York City, and falling in love with the city of Berlin. Read full book review >
STIR by Jessica Fechtor
Released: June 23, 2015

"The recipes are simple and uncomplicated; many of them have a handful of ingredients but are prepared in a way that might surprise you. Fechtor's book could be described the same way."
Dealing with the aftereffects of an aneurysm through a love of cooking. Read full book review >
IN A FRENCH KITCHEN by Susan Herrmann Loomis
Released: June 15, 2015

"A tempting and helpful guide to delectable food."
A warm invitation to the French table. Read full book review >
Released: June 2, 2015

"While Smith's text sometimes reads like a doctoral dissertation, all that meticulousness adds weight and authority to the evidence of the serious shortcomings of a medical specialty."
A scholarly history of food allergy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >