Food & Cooking Book Reviews

FORKED by Saru Jayaraman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A revealing exposé of the realities of restaurant work that makes a strong case for reform."
How diners can act on their ethical concerns each time they eat out. Read full book review >
100 MILLION YEARS OF FOOD by Stephen Le
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"The book's conclusions about what to eat and drink are common sense, but the journey Le takes to get us there is worth the cover price."
A biology professor traverses the globe to explore the evolution of food. Read full book review >

MY CONFECTION by Lisa Kotin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Full of finely sifted detail but uneven."
Actor and performance artist Kotin bravely reveals just how powerful sugar addiction can be. Read full book review >
FIRST BITE by Bee Wilson
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"With generous measures of grounded wisdom and solid research findings, the book should attract and possibly inspire broad groups of readers struggling with eating-related issues; for others, it may be of less interest."
An exploration of the notion that we can change our early food habits. Read full book review >
Salt & Pepper Cooking by James Haller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2015

"Flavorful serving of hilarious, poignant memories that will leave readers wanting seconds."
With these funny stories, an award-winning chef reflects on the formative roles of food, family, and friendship in his life. Read full book review >

THE RAGING SKILLET by Rossi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A humorous and witty chronicle of a woman's pulling-herself-up-by-her-bootstraps rise through the culinary ranks."
How one woman learned to cook and made a name for herself in the catering industry. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A well-researched look into yet another global market undergoing significant growth due to Chinese businesses and consumers."
Wine Spectator contributing editor Mustacich offers an in-depth account of the cultural and business tensions related to China's growing desire for fine wines. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A book that effectively presents a realistic, flexible diet."
A Los Angeles physician and nutrition specialist offers customized eating plans based on individual goals and insulin status. Read full book review >
THE MAD FEAST by Matthew Gavin Frank
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 9, 2015

"Although Frank's riffs occasionally recall Gertrude Stein's dizzyingly obscure Tender Buttons, overall, he's produced a surprising, entertaining look at what Americans eat and why."
A journey in search of America's tastes. Read full book review >
FALAFEL NATION by Yael Raviv
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"Readers wishing for a little more about food and a little less about nationalism may want to look elsewhere, but Raviv delivers an academic yet mostly accessible work of culinary anthropology."
What's in a falafel? By the lights of food-studies and nutrition adjunct professor Raviv, it's not just chickpeas and pita bread, but also identity. Read full book review >
RICE, NOODLE, FISH by Matt Goulding
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"A food connoisseur expertly unravels the intricate dance surrounding food in Japan."
A gourmand's tour through Japan. Read full book review >
EATING WORDS by Sandra M. Gilbert
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 26, 2015

"Useful as a textbook, the volume is a rewarding read for anyone who eats, cooks, or muses about food."
A literary feast for foodies. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >