Food & Cooking Book Reviews

A REALLY BIG LUNCH by Jim Harrison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 24, 2017

"If this is the last we get from Harrison, it serves as a fitting memorial."
A celebration of eating well and drinking even better as a recipe for the good life. Read full book review >
THE MEZCAL RUSH by Granville Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 14, 2017

"A rich, inclusive portrait of one of the world's great drinks."
A longtime journalist takes a cultural deep dive into the history and contemporary re-emergence of Mexico's second-most-famous elixir. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 20, 2017

"For food history and presidential history buffs alike, both entertaining and illuminating."
"The White House kitchen is a workplace, just like any other professional kitchen"—except, of course, that it's much more than that, a subject that food historian Miller (Soul Food, 2013) explores with gusto. Read full book review >
IS GOAT BEEF? by Jeffery M. Camp
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 2, 2017

"An enlightening, entertaining, and surprisingly moving hybrid of anecdotal military memoir and cookbook."
A decorated, retired Army veteran shares stories and recipes. Read full book review >
FOOD FIGHT by McKay Jenkins
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Impressive research into a complex situation presented in a highly readable form."
There are no easy answers to questions about genetically modified foods, but environmental journalist Jenkins lays out the promise and the peril of the contemporary industrialization of food production. Read full book review >

THE UNSETTLERS by Mark Sundeen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Provocative reading for anyone who has ever yearned for a life of radical simplicity."
Bright update on the perennial back-to-the-land movement. Read full book review >
EIGHT FLAVORS by Sarah Lohman
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A tantalizing look at flavors of the American table that foodies will absolutely devour."
A tasty historical study of flavorful mainstays of American cuisine. Read full book review >
MINCEMEAT by Leonardo Lucarelli
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A wickedly candid memoir."
An Italian chef's no-holds-barred memoir of his love-hate relationship with cooking and the cutthroat world of restaurant cuisine. Read full book review >
THE ETHICAL CARNIVORE by Louise Gray
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"A courageous and important narrative offering an enlightened perspective on making informed choices about eating meat."
Knowing where your food comes from is an important aspect of food culture for a growing segment of the American population. British environmental journalist Gray moves the idea into deeper territory. Read full book review >
RAY & JOAN by Lisa Napoli
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A book characterized by deep research and a seamless weaving together of the details of different lives."
A dual biography of the man who made McDonald's ubiquitous and his third wife, who, after his death, spent the last two decades of her life becoming one of most generous philanthropists in American history. Read full book review >
GRAPE, OLIVE, PIG by Matt Goulding
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A set of tantalizing verbal snapshots rather than a culinary map of the region, the book clearly communicates the author's affection for the food, both simple and refined, of his chosen country and makes obvious how much difference a change of just a few dozen miles makes in what ingredients and dishes are favored and seen as representative of the culture."
An enthusiastic journey through some of Spain's culinary hot spots, with emphasis on the work of professional chefs. Read full book review >
FOOD CITY by Joy Santlofer
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Rich, impeccably researched urban history with plenty of fun fodder for foodies."
A comprehensive history of New York City's food industry, from the late chair of New York University's Food Studies Program. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >