Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 12)

FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 11, 2006

"Revelations about how the way we eat affects the world we live in, presented with wit and elegance."
The dilemma—what to have for dinner when you are a creature with an open-ended appetite—leads Pollan (Journalism/Berkeley; The Botany of Desire, 2001, etc.) to a fascinating examination of the myriad connections along the principal food chains that lead from earth to dinner table. Read full book review >
MY LIFE IN FRANCE by Julia Child
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 7, 2006

"Charming, idiosyncratic and much fun—just like its author, who is very much alive in these pages. A blessing for lovers of France, food and fine writing."
"Ooh, those lovely roasted, buttery French chickens, they were so good and chickeny!" Anyone who remembers the iconic, deceased Julia Child (1912-2004)—or perhaps Dan Aykroyd's affectionate imitation of her—will recognize the singular voice. Read full book review >

THE BIG OYSTER by Mark Kurlansky
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 1, 2006

"A compelling, highly readable treat, whether you partake of Ostreidae or not."
Kurlansky (Boogaloo on Second Avenue, 2005, etc.) takes a fresh look at the tasty, once plentiful mollusk in this stimulating, often fascinating saga. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 27, 2005

"An intoxicating indulgence for Sideways fans, and an education for would-be wine sophisticates."
A vigorous account of the dare that made connoisseurs think differently about California wines—and that brought great wealth to Golden State vintners. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 23, 2005

"Intensely involving: a character study of a gifted, driven man and the world that created him."
Enthralling plunge into the world of the late Bernard Loiseau: celebrity chef, P.R. genius, and manic-depressive. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2005

"All in all, a great ride with a homegrown American original."
Television host Ellerbee roams around the world and through her memories, one meal at a time. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 25, 2005

"Being fully aware of the happy ending brings no diminishment of anxiety as the reader watches the insect march inexorably across the globe in this unlikely, thoroughly enjoyable cliffhanger."
Gripping account of a 19th-century plague that nearly wiped out the world's wine production. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 1, 2005

"Caviar, it turns out, is not just tasty. In Carey's hands, it's luminous."
Hard to imagine that a story about fish eggs could be "fast-paced," not to mention prophetic. But this piece of environmental journalism is both. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 9, 2004

"An enjoyable treat full of gastronomic guffaws."
GQ restaurant critic Richman serves up a sharp, rollicking collection of articles documenting his most memorable culinary experiences. Read full book review >
TOAST by Nigel Slater
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 11, 2004

"Paced as superbly as a seven-course meal, able to engage the heart and the memory as well as the taste buds."
British cookbook author Slater takes an engrossing, revealing look back at his 1960s childhood through the foods that filled his family's kitchen. Read full book review >
FRIED BUTTER by Abe Opincar
FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 1, 2003

"Elemental acuity and burlesque combine here to delicious effect."
Food as memory, memory as food, experienced with the unexpectedness of déjà vu, knocked between melancholy and humor, as summoned by newcomer Opincar. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2002

"The tenacity and availability of life, amply admired and admirably evoked."
From newcomer Foster, a keen and wholly lovely catalogue of seasons growing spuds in the midst of swells. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >