Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 2)

THE FERMENTED MAN by Derek Dellinger
Released: July 19, 2016

"The author hopes his intriguing experiments will open eyes and palates to the culinary and health benefits of fermented foods."
A quest to live for a year on "100 percent…fermented meals and fermented drinks." Read full book review >
HOW TO EAT PALEO by Cynthia Spivey
Released: July 18, 2016

"A brief, useful primer with enough provocative food for thought for newcomers and veterans alike."
An ideology-free outline of the paleo approach to dining, focusing on why certain foods are invited, or snubbed, at the paleo table. Read full book review >

Released: July 12, 2016

"A provocative yet grounded look at the U.S. food industry. Though the prospect of finding quality food products may prove increasingly challenging for most consumers, Olmsted provides encouraging tips to help navigate the many obstacles."
An investigation of the American food industry, providing examples of authentic and fraudulent products and how best to differentiate between the two. Read full book review >
Released: June 21, 2016

"A thoughtful, informative journey into the transforming—and transformative—world of food."
A food writer considers what artisanship really means. Read full book review >
Released: June 21, 2016

"A well-made, evenhanded, sometimes cautionary story of business, told with the affection and exasperation of an insider."
Everyone's a wiener in this frank account by a scion of hot dog nobility. Read full book review >

Released: June 14, 2016

"French cuisine once was unassailable, the West's finest, but while its influence has diminished even in France—as have many of the dishes that established its reputation—French food still commands a certain fascination, and Behr explores it with appetizing ardor."
The Art of Eating magazine founder Behr (50 Foods, 2013, etc.) serves as an admirable traveling companion through the world of French cuisine, offering high sailing on gustatory seas as well as grounding in history and broader cultural concerns. Read full book review >
Released: June 7, 2016

"An enjoyable memoir for wheat-free foodies and others limited in their gastronomical choices."
Faced at age 36 with the sudden onset of celiac disease, a professor realizes that his days of brewing beer and eating his wife's homemade bread are over. Read full book review >
DOUBLE CUP LOVE by Eddie Huang
Released: May 31, 2016

"A challenging author continues to bravely bare his soul along with his best dishes."
BaoHaus celebrity chef Huang (Fresh Off the Boat, 2012) returns with a fresh mélange of hip-hop patter, Chengdu street cuisine, and Asian-American identity politics.Read full book review >
Released: May 31, 2016

"A wide-ranging, toothsome smorgasbord of Gotham's good eats and the tireless men and women behind each plate."
Exuberant New York chefs and restaurateurs share their culinary histories. Read full book review >
THE OPPOSITE OF WOE by John Hickenlooper
Released: May 24, 2016

"Hickenlooper draws an analogy between brewing and politics (the activist as yeast, the political leader as brewer), but however apt that metaphor, it's difficult to imagine a more unusual preparation for public life than the one ably recounted here."
Colorado's high-profile governor submits an unconventional autobiography. Read full book review >
32 YOLKS by Eric Ripert
Released: May 17, 2016

"It doesn't take a refined palate to savor Ripert's culinary adventures."
The acclaimed French chef and co-owner of Le Bernardin delivers a breezy account of his life in France and Andorra before he moved to the United States in his early 20s. Read full book review >
FOLLOWING FISH by Samanth Subramanian
Released: May 10, 2016

"An enjoyable exploration of the coastline of India, with a focus on fish."
A travelogue by an Indian journalist about the many roles of fish within his nation's culture. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >