Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 2)

Released: May 5, 2015

"A lively, informative farm-to-table feast."
An enlightening culinary history of an "uncanny beast." Read full book review >
Released: May 5, 2015

"An intelligent rallying cry for anyone seeking a safe and healthy food supply, and all that entails."
When a book begins with an essay titled "A Food Manifesto for the Future," you know the author is on a mission. Read full book review >

THE DORITO EFFECT by Mark Schatzker
Released: May 5, 2015

"After reading this engaging book, readers may wonder with every bite of food if what they are tasting is real."
Canadian food writer Schatzker (Steak: One Man's Search for the World's Tastiest Piece of Beef, 2010) shows how the manipulation of food has led to our taste buds developing a "warped" relationship "with the fuel our bodies require, food."Read full book review >
PIG TALES by Barry Estabrook
Released: May 4, 2015

"A thoroughly researched, deftly written piece of investigative journalism. Estabrook and his partner still eat bacon, but they are careful about the source of the pork."
Former Gourmet contributing editor Estabrook (Tomatoland: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit, 2011) presents a journalistic exposé of the pork industry with the same skill demonstrated in his exploration of the tomato industry.Read full book review >
MY ORGANIC LIFE by Nora Pouillon
Released: April 21, 2015

"An inspiring account and great fun to read."
In a sparkling memoir, the founder of Restaurant Nora tells of making her own journey into the food world. Read full book review >

Released: April 7, 2015

"A scrumptious pairing of nourishment and familial devotion."
A mother and her two adult daughters explore their unified histories through themes of food, hard work and love. Read full book review >
Released: March 24, 2015

"A fine addition to the single-issue science genre."
"From tropical rain forests to alpine meadows and arctic tundra, seed plants dominate landscapes and define ecosystems." In fact, they make up more than 90 percent of land flora. Read full book review >
Released: March 24, 2015

"Engaging, precise baking guide that will have readers heading for the kitchen with enthusiasm and confidence."
A tasty treat of practical cookie making, historical cookie-mold information, and a wide range of recipes, all served with appetizing sides of baking history and great photographs. Read full book review >
Released: March 3, 2015

"Poignant, heartwarming and generously filled with delicious recipes."
An award-winning blogger and MFK Fisher scholar's account of how food not only came to define a difficult childhood, but also became the way she was able to heal her past. Read full book review >
A Legacy of Sephardic, Mediterranean and American Recipes by Rachel Almeleh
Released: Dec. 30, 2014

"An inviting collection of Sephardic and Mediterranean recipes."
Almeleh's cookbook offers a cornucopia of recipes from Sephardic and other cuisines. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"For readers with a strong interest in environmental and public health and food safety policy, this may be one of the most important books of the year."
A thorough examination of industrial chemicals in our food chain by an acclaimed French journalist and documentary filmmaker. Read full book review >
THE CHAIN by Ted Genoways
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"The author tells a sad, horrifying story, a severe indictment of both corporate greed and consumer complacency."
A scathing report on the consequences of factory farming. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >