Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 3)

FIRST BITE by Bee Wilson
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"With generous measures of grounded wisdom and solid research findings, the book should attract and possibly inspire broad groups of readers struggling with eating-related issues; for others, it may be of less interest."
An exploration of the notion that we can change our early food habits. Read full book review >
Since 1940 by Fran's Restaurant
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 25, 2015

"An affectionate look at a favorite local diner that will appeal most to those who know and love it."
A well-known Toronto diner shares history, period photographs, and some favorite recipes. Read full book review >

Salt & Pepper Cooking by James Haller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2015

"Flavorful serving of hilarious, poignant memories that will leave readers wanting seconds."
With these funny stories, an award-winning chef reflects on the formative roles of food, family, and friendship in his life. Read full book review >
THE RAGING SKILLET by Rossi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A humorous and witty chronicle of a woman's pulling-herself-up-by-her-bootstraps rise through the culinary ranks."
How one woman learned to cook and made a name for herself in the catering industry. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A well-researched look into yet another global market undergoing significant growth due to Chinese businesses and consumers."
Wine Spectator contributing editor Mustacich offers an in-depth account of the cultural and business tensions related to China's growing desire for fine wines. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A book that effectively presents a realistic, flexible diet."
A Los Angeles physician and nutrition specialist offers customized eating plans based on individual goals and insulin status. Read full book review >
THE MAD FEAST by Matthew Gavin Frank
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 9, 2015

"Although Frank's riffs occasionally recall Gertrude Stein's dizzyingly obscure Tender Buttons, overall, he's produced a surprising, entertaining look at what Americans eat and why."
A journey in search of America's tastes. Read full book review >
FALAFEL NATION by Yael Raviv
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"Readers wishing for a little more about food and a little less about nationalism may want to look elsewhere, but Raviv delivers an academic yet mostly accessible work of culinary anthropology."
What's in a falafel? By the lights of food-studies and nutrition adjunct professor Raviv, it's not just chickpeas and pita bread, but also identity. Read full book review >
RICE, NOODLE, FISH by Matt Goulding
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"A food connoisseur expertly unravels the intricate dance surrounding food in Japan."
A gourmand's tour through Japan. Read full book review >
EATING WORDS by Sandra M. Gilbert
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 26, 2015

"Useful as a textbook, the volume is a rewarding read for anyone who eats, cooks, or muses about food."
A literary feast for foodies. Read full book review >
DRINKING IN AMERICA by Susan Cheever
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"An intelligently argued study of our country's 'passionate connection to drinking.'"
A distinguished biographer and cultural historian offers a fascinating look at the place and function of alcohol throughout American history. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 7, 2015

"A highly scientific, impressively researched map to better health through a plant-based diet."
A diet and lifestyle guide based on evolutionary science that compares humans and gorillas. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >