Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 4)

PICNIC IN PROVENCE by Elizabeth Bard
Released: April 7, 2015

"Delectable reading."
A journalist's account of the unexpectedly rich life she and her French husband made together after leaving Paris for a small town in southern France. Read full book review >
FED, WHITE, AND BLUE by Simon Majumdar
Released: April 7, 2015

"Filled with loving portraits of quirky characters, Majumdar's series of vignettes is a candid and endearing snapshot of not only American food culture, but America itself."
A food writer's cross-country search for what it means to be an American. Read full book review >

Released: April 7, 2015

"A scrumptious pairing of nourishment and familial devotion."
A mother and her two adult daughters explore their unified histories through themes of food, hard work and love. Read full book review >
Released: March 24, 2015

"A fine addition to the single-issue science genre."
"From tropical rain forests to alpine meadows and arctic tundra, seed plants dominate landscapes and define ecosystems." In fact, they make up more than 90 percent of land flora. Read full book review >
ORCHARD HOUSE by Tara Austen Weaver
Released: March 24, 2015

"Honest and moving, one woman's initiation into intensive gardening with her mother, which changed a neglected space into something beautiful and bountiful and shifted their relationship as well."
How a novice gardener became a permaculturalist and found community in the process. Read full book review >

Released: March 24, 2015

"Engaging, precise baking guide that will have readers heading for the kitchen with enthusiasm and confidence."
A tasty treat of practical cookie making, historical cookie-mold information, and a wide range of recipes, all served with appetizing sides of baking history and great photographs. Read full book review >
EATING VIET NAM by Graham Holliday
Released: March 17, 2015

"Readers are likely to run out of patience before the author has run out of pages."
A celebration of Vietnamese street food, with some offerings that will make readers squirm as much as the author initially did. Read full book review >
Released: March 9, 2015

"Provocative though unlikely to reach far beyond the choir box."
A condemnatory look at the factory-farming model that has overpopulated the planet with too many cattle, to the detriment of all involved. Read full book review >
Released: March 3, 2015

"Poignant, heartwarming and generously filled with delicious recipes."
An award-winning blogger and MFK Fisher scholar's account of how food not only came to define a difficult childhood, but also became the way she was able to heal her past. Read full book review >
THE JOY OF REAL FOOD by Rowena Jayne
Released: Feb. 4, 2015

"An often engaging book that offers original ways to bring variety to daily meal preparation—even for readers who aren't ready to commit to a raw-food, vegan lifestyle."
This brightly illustrated, eclectic compilation of vegan recipes urges readers to find joy by changing unhealthful culinary habits. Read full book review >
BON APPÉTEMPT by Amelia Morris
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"Whether Morris is deconstructing her failed attempts at finding satisfying work, struggling with rocky family relationships or experiencing a culinary failure, she adroitly blends the ingredients of humor and self-reflection."
A refreshing take on growing up and coming to terms with the joys and travails of family, career and navigating the kitchen. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"A nimble story about how one man's revolutionary ideas changed the way we eat."
Former country music singer/songwriter and newly minted geography doctorate student Carlisle unearths the secret history of a rogue posse of organic farmers operating deep in rural Montana. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >