Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 4)

A Legacy of Sephardic, Mediterranean and American Recipes by Rachel Almeleh
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Dec. 30, 2014

"An inviting collection of Sephardic and Mediterranean recipes."
Almeleh's cookbook offers a cornucopia of recipes from Sephardic and other cuisines. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"For readers with a strong interest in environmental and public health and food safety policy, this may be one of the most important books of the year."
A thorough examination of industrial chemicals in our food chain by an acclaimed French journalist and documentary filmmaker. Read full book review >

THE CHAIN by Ted Genoways
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"The author tells a sad, horrifying story, a severe indictment of both corporate greed and consumer complacency."
A scathing report on the consequences of factory farming. Read full book review >
COME HERE OFTEN? by Sean Manning
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A delightful collection that will surely inspire many bar-hopping tours."
Writers share anecdotes and reminiscences about their favorite bars from around the world. Read full book review >
DARE TO PAIR by Julie Pech
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A useful, enjoyable read about the restrained debauchery of consuming chocolate with the fruit of the vine."
A concise guide to the art of pairing chocolate dishes with various types of wines. Read full book review >

EAT MORE BETTER by Dan Pashman
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 4, 2014

"A good-natured, clever and informative romp through the modern culinary landscape."
The creator and host of WNYC's podcast The Sporkful develops a humorous, witty narrative delivered in the form of a pseudo-textbook. Read full book review >
THE EDIBLE SOUTH by Marcie Cohen Ferris
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 22, 2014

"In this colorful and well-researched history, the author shows persuasively how food has shaped and nourished Southern identity."
Food serves as a useful lens for examining race, economics, gender and class in the South, from plantation days to the present. Read full book review >
THE LANGUAGE OF FOOD by Dan Jurafsky
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 15, 2014

"A highly informative and entertaining compendium of food and word facts sure to appeal to foodies and etymologists alike."
The evolution of the names and ingredients in popular foods. Read full book review >
IN SEARCH OF THE PERFECT LOAF by Samuel Fromartz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2014

"Richly detailed history and lively anecdotes make this book a consummate celebration of the deceptively simple loaf of bread."
Botany, culinary history and recipes from a bread lover. Read full book review >
THE HILLS OF CHIANTI by Piero Antinori
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"A delightful celebration of an extraordinary Italian family's enduring love affair with wine."
The Antinori family has been producing wine in Tuscany since 1385. Gracefully capitalizing on his family's story, winemaker Antinori chronicles the unique business and personal relationships of this remarkable family enterprise. Read full book review >
MY DRUNK KITCHEN by Hannah Hart
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 12, 2014

"A rollicking, tongue-in-cheek guidebook to discovering one's own route through life."
Transplanted New Yorker Hart's idea of creating a fake cooking show began as a joke for a friend in California. At last count, her YouTube channel, "My Drunk Kitchen," had tallied more than 66 million views. Hart's "cookbook" will surely enlarge her audience and please her fans. Read full book review >
THE CULINARY IMAGINATION by Sandra M. Gilbert
FOOD & COOKING
Released: July 28, 2014

"Gilbert wears her scholarship lightly in this warm, lively inquiry into the social, political, ethical and aesthetic meanings of 'food, glorious food!'"
A literary scholar investigates the cultural meaning of food. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >