Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 49)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Intense, sensuous, lyrical, shaped by the sensibility of a poet and the eye of a farmer."
California farmer/memoirist Masumoto (Harvest Son, 1998, etc.) meanders through his fields and memories by way of the five senses. Read full book review >
PASTA by Silvano Serventi
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Sometimes endlessly informative (for instance, on pasta-making machinery) as it offers more in the way of pasta history than most readers have even begun to imagine."
Scholarly investigation of the quintessentially Italian carbohydrate. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 12, 2002

"A good and leathery year abroad, an honest and deeply enjoyed experience that avoids skimming off only the fruity bonbons while neglecting the ruck of daily life."
A French village, a good restaurant, and a year's worth of time to spend in both add stock to the lives of Sanders and his family. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 6, 2002

"Steingarten sings of his supper, grand cuisine, or Thanksgiving turkey with panache and canny wit."
The vaunted food writer for Vogue, a former lawyer who now practices the equally underappreciated vocation of gastronomy, discusses the world's first (or at least second) most overwhelming preoccupation: eats. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Energetic and certainly lively, but the jokey personal comments soon wear thin."
Perky, contrived account of visits to the great bread-making cultures of the world—recipes included. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Still, readers will salivate as they glimpse tables set with roasts and game birds, sauces and soups, fruits and ices, extravaganzas of pastry—and plenty of wine. (b&w illustrations)"
An extravagant paean to the import of dining, cast as historical reports of memorable meals. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"An exhaustive and lively assemblage, best for snacking rather than gorging."
Bestselling food historian Kurlansky (Salt, 2002, etc.) collects writing from two millennia that describes with wit and zest cooks, cooking, and cuisines. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 24, 2002

"What Napa was, what it is, where it's going: Conaway weighs them in the balance, and shudders."
Visions and desires clash memorably in the bottle green valley of the Napa River. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 15, 2002

"Here's whatever is worth knowing about Romanoff and Petrossian and the remarkable history of beluga, osetra, or sevruga eggs, all in this one basket, served with much style."
An experienced hand in Eastern Europe and Russia, now architecture critic for the Philadelphia Inquirer, reports extensively on a snack for the well-heeled that used to come from Russia with, if not love, then much salt. Her text surveys the art, science and lore of sturgeon roe: caviar, of course. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 7, 2002

"Both amusing and dismaying. (8 pages color, 45 b&w illustrations, some not seen)"
A witty, acerbic, and, for those women who grew up in the mid-20th century, painful review of the social and marketplace pressures that reduced women to "soft, delicate, nurturing beings made of ‘sugar and spice and everything nice.' " Read full book review >
VEGETARIANISM by Colin Spencer
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"A capable blend of dietary, religious, and political history that will please like-minded readers—but perhaps prompt contrarians to cook up a cheeseburger, rare."
Would the world be a better place if humans stopped eating things with faces? Indubitably, asserts English food-writer Spencer in this lively if sometimes debatable treatise. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: July 16, 2002

"This is advice? Why drink mediocre (or worse) wine at all?"
A rather unhelpful introduction to wine from Beardsall, a wine professional, that may well leave neophytes with more confusions and doubts than when they started. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >