Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 49)

Released: July 1, 1998

"Among a sprawl of books incessantly issued and hyped, this small, wise volume quietly calls us to read and be renewed. (50 color photos)"
Lyrical tale of the survival and triumph of a small farm amid the suburban sprawl of southern California, with writing as rich and satisfying as the taste of a ripe melon. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 1998

"As always, Miss Manners provides what one 'gentle reader' calls her 'polite, succinct and effective rejoinders.'"
In the second entry in her "Basic Training" series, Miss Manners, with her usual wit and graciousness, instructs us in how to respond to awkward, embarrassing, or just downright rude comments from others. Read full book review >

Released: March 23, 1998

"Lang's wartime experiences were horrifying, but his book is mainly a lighthearted celebration of good friends, good food, and the good life he's found in the culinary world. (40 b&w photos, not seen)"
International restaurateur Lang takes stock of his life's path from small-town Hungary to the summits of world dining—and has fun along the way. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 1998

"A perfectly balanced stew of memories: not too sweet, not too tart. (First printing of 40,000; author tour)"
The restaurant critic of the New York Times whips up a savory memoir of her apprentice years. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"So much to inspire; too much to summarize."
Her cunning as a culinary essayist, memoirist, and fiction writer won't fully prepare Fisher's many fans for her gusto as an informal correspondent. Read full book review >

Released: Dec. 15, 1997

"The 20 illustrations include contemporary photos of White Castle outlets and the company's early advertisements."
A scholar's lively account of how White Castle, now a largely overlooked but still profitable also-ran in the domestic restaurant trade, made the once-scorned hamburger a US institution and launched the fast-food industry. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

"An attractive mise en place, but one that lacks the simple artistry of that long-remembered potato."
A writer enters the Culinary Institute of America, the Ivy League of cooking schools. Read full book review >
THE PARTY by Sally Quinn
Released: Nov. 5, 1997

"Go to Miss Manners for a useful guide to party giving or to almost any celebrity bio for better anecdotes about parties-I- have-known. (b&w illustrations)"
Trite, trivial, and tasteless describe this unrewarding effort of a society reporter, novelist, and ``sometime Washington hostess.'' That latter label horrified Quinn (Happy Endings, 1991) when she heard it aplied to her on Good Morning America. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Despite its moments, this autobiography is clunky, desperately self-promoting, and, at best, premature."
In case you were interested, here's everything you could ever possibly want to know about Robinson's (Oxford Companion to Wine) career trajectory. Read full book review >
APPETITE FOR LIFE by Noel Riley Fitch
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"An exhaustively researched, charming story of a life well lived, and an admiring portrait of a good marriage."
Riley (Anaãs: The Erotic Life of Anaãs Nin, 1993, etc.) offers a loving, overstuffed biography of the cook from Pasadena who introduced French cooking to the American kitchen. Read full book review >
STORIES FROM THE ROUND BARN by Jacqueline Dougan Jackson
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Jackson finds little gems in the muck and toil of farming life. (photos, not seen)"
Delicately filigreed vignettes of a Wisconsin farm life from children's-book author Jackson. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 18, 1997

"Though this is unsatisfying as a skim-milk latte in places, Schultz is less a braggart and more a true believer than many CEOs, and (with Business Week staffer Yang) he provides a pleasing read. ($300,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
A chatty history of Starbucks by its CEO, who announces that he considers the company to be only in its third chapter (which is nowhere near the eleventh). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >