Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 5)

Nepali Home Cooking for Healthy Living by Sharada Jnawali
FOOD & COOKING
Released: July 17, 2014

"A worthwhile choice for focused amateur chefs or holistic-minded readers."
Jnawali and Da Mata's cheerful debut cookbook highlights the health benefits of Nepal's plants, spices and herbs in accessible vegetarian recipes. Read full book review >
ORGANIC by Peter Laufer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2014

"A lively, highly informative exposé capped by trips to Kazakhstan and Bolivia, where Laufer settles his questions about the walnuts and black beans he purchased. Now, how to fix the situation so that not all foods labeled organic are 'suspect'?"
Former NBC News correspondent Laufer (Journalism/Oregon Univ.; The Elusive State of Jefferson: A Journey through the 51st State, 2013, etc.) investigates the "need to know what we're eating and how it came to our dinner plates." Read full book review >

AMERICAN CATCH by Paul Greenberg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 30, 2014

"A fascinating discussion of a multifaceted issue and a passionate call to action."
Blue Ocean Institute fellow Greenberg (Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food, 2010, etc.) offers an optimistic perspective on the connection between preserving our salt marshes and restoring America's offshore seafood production. Read full book review >
PROOF by Adam Rogers
FOOD & COOKING
Released: June 3, 2014

"Rogers gives booze a thorough going over, complete with good cheer, highbrow humor and smarts."
From the action of the yeast to the blear of the hangover, via the witchery of fermentation, distillation and aging, Wired articles editor Rogers takes readers on a splendid tour of the booze-making process. Read full book review >
THE THIRD PLATE by Dan Barber
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 20, 2014

"In this bold and impassioned analysis, Barber insists that chefs have the power to transform American cuisine to achieve a sustainable and nutritious future."
A multiple James Beard Award-winning chef proposes a revolutionary change for growing and consuming food. Read full book review >

EATING WILDLY by Ava Chin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2014

"A delectable feast of the heart."
A professor and journalist's engaging account of how being an urban forager in New York City led her to unexpected personal enlightenment. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 13, 2014

"Solid, well-reported science in the Gary Taubes mold."
Journalist Teicholz combs the science, or lack thereof, to learn how the fats in the American diet grew horns and cloven hooves. Read full book review >
KNISH by Laura Silver
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 6, 2014

"An accomplished piece of research shared in a delightfully readable way."
When is a knish more than just a knish? When it is the repository of more than a century of Jewish immigrant culture. Read full book review >
BOURBON by Dane Huckelbridge
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 2014

"A snappy history of the popular spirit's rise and continued ascent."
A mirthful, erudite appreciation of bourbon and its striking history. Read full book review >
SOUS CHEF by Michael Gibney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 25, 2014

"Sumptuously entertaining fare."
An experienced sous chef and first-time author skillfully deconstructs a 24-hour work cycle of a sous chef in a New York kitchen. Read full book review >
EARTH ESSENCE by Helmut Norbert Taferner
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 7, 2014

"A hearty and savory collection, with a few sweet delights thrown in."
A collection of healthy alternatives to traditional comfort food. Read full book review >
THE MEAT RACKET by Christopher Leonard
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 18, 2014

"An authoritative look at a ruthlessly efficient system."
An engrossing report on the industrialized American meat business. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >