Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 50)

MIRIAM'S KITCHEN by Elizabeth Ehrlich
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"It is a savory stew made from the social and cultural ingredients of American-Jewish life. (Author tour)"
An appealing, sensitive account of an assimilated Jewish woman's efforts to embrace the religious traditions of her ancestors. Read full book review >
COD by Mark Kurlansky
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

Cod—that whitest of the white-fleshed fish, prize of every fish-and-chips establishment—gets expert, loving, and encyclopedic handling from Food and Wine columnist Kurlansky (A Chosen Few: The Resurrection of European Jewry, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >

Released: July 1, 1997

"An appealing and often amusing history of a less-than-noble drink, written with style and a genuine appreciation for the good old days before Miller Time went global. (Author tour)"
An industry insider's account of how B-school grads with no brew experience became the nation's tastemakers. Read full book review >
Released: June 1, 1997

"The food writing isn't quite as nourishing as that of Calvin Trillin, Waverly Root, or A.J. Liebling (to whom Stevens pays appropriate respect); it's more of a lark in the Bertie Wooster mode, and cosmopolitan to a fault."
Stevens, political consultant and author of whimsical travelogues (Malaria Dreams, 1989, etc.), accepts the formidable challenge of dining in all 29 of the Michelin three-star restaurants in Europe on consecutive nights, and lives to tell the story. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 1997

"Inevitably, just a bit gaseous. ($30,000 ad/promo; TV satellite tour)"
That guy in the bib overalls who shows up on TV on Sunday mornings offers a tongue-in-cheek celebration of the larger meaning of the comestibles he likes. Read full book review >

Released: May 1, 1997

"Many of the foods here are obscure, but this delicious etymological feast will satiate anyone who enjoys the taste of words."
A contributing editor to Allure and the author of A Garden of Words (not reviewed), Barnette uses her background in classical languages to inform and delight the reader by tracing the whimsical manner in which food names found their way to our lexical pantries. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 1997

"This strives to be candid and intimate, yet ultimately its commentary fails to break through the commemorative into the kind of real analysis that would have revealed more of the man behind the movement icon. (105 b&w photos, not seen)"
A useful survey and pictorial of the extraordinary career of the visionary Mexican-American labor leader and human-rights activist, who died in his sleep in 1993 at age 66. Read full book review >
GOOD LAND by Bruce Bair
Released: March 17, 1997

"But given the cruel nature of Bair's father, growing up on a farm never sounded so miserable."
This collection of mostly short, often nastily revealing pieces by journalist Bair on his childhood on a 4,000-acre wheat farm in Kansas reflects poorly on farm life and the midwestern character. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

Miss Manners has no tolerance for call-waiting, but answering machines, E-mail, and fax machines—used with consideration and an understanding of basic etiquette—are fine with her. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Useful to those interested in the history of women, cooking, or publishing; but it is Mendelson's obvious interest in her project that makes this a good read. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A winning account of the life of one of America's standard cookbooks, with portraits of the mother and daughter who brought it into millions of homes. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"An air of dissertation pervades this book, drawn as it is form doctoral studies, and Lapsley comes across as dry and formal- -very much like the Bordeaux grape he so appreciates. (map; 23 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Forget the flowery title, a bit of whimsy from Robert Louis Stevenson. Read full book review >
THE GRAPES OF RALPH by Ralph Steadman
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Effervescent and not too dry."
For the oenophile with a sense of humor: In The Grapes Of Ralph ($35.00; Oct. 1996; 224 pages; ISBN 0-15-100245-2) the wicked cartoonist and illustrator offers a tour of the wine countries of the world and their leading denizens. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >