Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 50)

FOOD & COOKING
Released: July 1, 2002

"An inviting and edifying introduction to the improvers, who 'offered an opposite kind of change from the blaze and shift of nineteenth-century America.'"
An engaging examination of the early proponents of restorative husbandry—their origins, motivations, and how their ideas played out—from Yale historian Stoll. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2002

"The tenacity and availability of life, amply admired and admirably evoked."
From newcomer Foster, a keen and wholly lovely catalogue of seasons growing spuds in the midst of swells. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 1, 2002

"Extremely broad, frustratingly shallow."
A stroll through the history of some food taboos that have caught the author's fancy, loosely organized around the seven deadly sins. Read full book review >
BREAKING CLEAN by Judy Blunt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 12, 2002

"Profound, and profoundly moving."
A memoir of growing up a cattleman's daughter in northeastern Montana in the 1950s and '60s. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"Ultimately, then, it's not about the food, it's about the chef and author: a high-maintenance gent, brash, insightful, a jokester, and certainly someone you wouldn't want by your side at a touchy border crossing."
Over-the-top and highly diverting international culinary adventures, always to be taken with a generous grain of salt—and make it Fleur de Sel—and best consumed a bite at a time. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Of interest only to food activists and organic-gardening buffs—who are probably already converts to the cause."
The pleasures are few, the politics plenty, in this preachy treatise on the politically correct production and consumption of food. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Delightful in small doses, but too intense to be consumed in a single sitting."
Novelist Harrison (The Beast God Forgot to Invent, 2000, etc.), a man of firm opinions and titanic appetites, here collects his previously published essays on food. Read full book review >
A SHORT HISTORY OF WINE by Rod Phillips
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"A laudably compact and versed telling of wine's story."
A limpid overview nestles wine—that most charged and symbolic of foods—within its historical and cultural contexts. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Nicely balancing recent encyclopedic treatments such as the Cambridge World History of Food, Rebora's slender volume should be of interest to foodies, cookbook collectors, and historians alike."
A lively stroll through (mostly southern) European culinary history. Read full book review >
STANDING UP TO THE ROCK by T. Louise Freeman-Toole
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 17, 2001

"Freeman-Toole's voice is easy on the ear, and her stories have that clear, sere quality that marks the land she came to love. (16 photographs)"
Warm yet unsentimental engagements with a cattle ranch on the Palouse. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 16, 2001

"Informative, comprehensive—but burdened by gee-whiz insights into the ways of the world."
An American writer details her infatuation with French bread, in a part-reportage and part-earnest attempt to understand national differences and obsessions. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 15, 2001

A corrective to Frankenfood alarmists: Genetic engineering of plants and animals has been going on for millennia, thanks to humankind's tinkering. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >