Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 52)

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 15, 1997

"The 20 illustrations include contemporary photos of White Castle outlets and the company's early advertisements."
A scholar's lively account of how White Castle, now a largely overlooked but still profitable also-ran in the domestic restaurant trade, made the once-scorned hamburger a US institution and launched the fast-food industry. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

"An attractive mise en place, but one that lacks the simple artistry of that long-remembered potato."
A writer enters the Culinary Institute of America, the Ivy League of cooking schools. Read full book review >

THE PARTY by Sally Quinn
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 5, 1997

"Go to Miss Manners for a useful guide to party giving or to almost any celebrity bio for better anecdotes about parties-I- have-known. (b&w illustrations)"
Trite, trivial, and tasteless describe this unrewarding effort of a society reporter, novelist, and ``sometime Washington hostess.'' That latter label horrified Quinn (Happy Endings, 1991) when she heard it aplied to her on Good Morning America. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Despite its moments, this autobiography is clunky, desperately self-promoting, and, at best, premature."
In case you were interested, here's everything you could ever possibly want to know about Robinson's (Oxford Companion to Wine) career trajectory. Read full book review >
APPETITE FOR LIFE by Noel Riley Fitch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"An exhaustively researched, charming story of a life well lived, and an admiring portrait of a good marriage."
Riley (Anaãs: The Erotic Life of Anaãs Nin, 1993, etc.) offers a loving, overstuffed biography of the cook from Pasadena who introduced French cooking to the American kitchen. Read full book review >

STORIES FROM THE ROUND BARN by Jacqueline Dougan Jackson
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Jackson finds little gems in the muck and toil of farming life. (photos, not seen)"
Delicately filigreed vignettes of a Wisconsin farm life from children's-book author Jackson. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 18, 1997

"Though this is unsatisfying as a skim-milk latte in places, Schultz is less a braggart and more a true believer than many CEOs, and (with Business Week staffer Yang) he provides a pleasing read. ($300,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
A chatty history of Starbucks by its CEO, who announces that he considers the company to be only in its third chapter (which is nowhere near the eleventh). Read full book review >
MIRIAM'S KITCHEN by Elizabeth Ehrlich
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"It is a savory stew made from the social and cultural ingredients of American-Jewish life. (Author tour)"
An appealing, sensitive account of an assimilated Jewish woman's efforts to embrace the religious traditions of her ancestors. Read full book review >
COD by Mark Kurlansky
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

Cod—that whitest of the white-fleshed fish, prize of every fish-and-chips establishment—gets expert, loving, and encyclopedic handling from Food and Wine columnist Kurlansky (A Chosen Few: The Resurrection of European Jewry, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"An appealing and often amusing history of a less-than-noble drink, written with style and a genuine appreciation for the good old days before Miller Time went global. (Author tour)"
An industry insider's account of how B-school grads with no brew experience became the nation's tastemakers. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: June 1, 1997

"The food writing isn't quite as nourishing as that of Calvin Trillin, Waverly Root, or A.J. Liebling (to whom Stevens pays appropriate respect); it's more of a lark in the Bertie Wooster mode, and cosmopolitan to a fault."
Stevens, political consultant and author of whimsical travelogues (Malaria Dreams, 1989, etc.), accepts the formidable challenge of dining in all 29 of the Michelin three-star restaurants in Europe on consecutive nights, and lives to tell the story. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1997

"Inevitably, just a bit gaseous. ($30,000 ad/promo; TV satellite tour)"
That guy in the bib overalls who shows up on TV on Sunday mornings offers a tongue-in-cheek celebration of the larger meaning of the comestibles he likes. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >