Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 52)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Initially solid case study of American business degenerates into a vanity publication."
A fawning biography of the restaurateur who brought glitzy haute cuisine to New York. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"A smart, engaging history of the uses of, attitudes toward, and wars over the world's most mysterious plant. (Illustrations throughout)"
From ancient, South American, meter-long cigars (and you thought Cheech and Chong rolled big) to modern Chinese teenagers lighting up because it "looks cool," a fast-paced, comprehensive look at tobacco and its consumers. Read full book review >

BEST FOOD WRITING 2000 by Holly Hughes
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"Plenty of satisfying entrees here, but next year the editor should try to provide some more adventurous fare as well."
The debut of a planned annual collection, this stellar selection of mostly American food writing has everything but the unexpected. Read full book review >
AMERICAN VINTAGE by Paul Lukacs
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 16, 2000

"There is currently a debate in wine circles about whether all bottles of wine need to breathe. But there is little debate that American winemaking history has had sufficient aeration—with the result that the subject is getting flat."
The history of American winemaking, by now pretty well-turned ground, gets a further spading from Washington Times wine columnist Lukacs. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"Highly satisfying."
A clear-eyed, affectionate exploration of traditional cuisine's place in the culture and politics of an ever-changing France. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"More meditative than fiery, Manning provides a revealing, heedful 'window into what the world is doing about agriculture, and what urgently needs to be done.'"
Manning (Grassland, 1996, etc.), a shrewd and passionate environmentalist, strikes a reserved, cerebral chord here as he discusses how some third-world countries are facing the looming food shortage. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Aug. 24, 2000

"Unfortunately, Cooper has bitten off more than she can chew, and the effectiveness of her many food-related messages is weakened by a lack of focus."
A concerned chef puts the food supply under scrutiny and comes up with some bad news about what's wrong with the way we're growing our food and eating it too. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: June 15, 2000

"A slow-to-boil (if impeccably researched) history and reference source for the cooking student and scholar."
Trubek's slim overview of the French influence on culinary history suffers from the dry rhetoric of academese. Read full book review >
CITIZEN COORS by Dan Baum
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2000

"Although the narrative is occasionally plodding, Baum's history is incendiary, providing fuel for many a political fire."
An anecdotal history tracing the fortunes of the American brewing family known as much for its right-wing politics as for its suds, written by former Wall Street Journal reporter Baum (Smoke and Mirrors, 1996). Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 15, 2000

"Entertaining, thoughtful, and educational."
From a familiar, reputable—if sometimes offbeat—source, a worthwhile discussion of how to formulate a healthy approach to eating. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"Tisdale caters to our insatiable, 'secret' appetite for the bonding and sacrament of food, a lonely and famished nostalgia that exposes our millennial cupboards as bare."
An appetizing critique of modern food culture, spiced with gourmet phrasing, that questions America's continuing affair with Happy Meal cuisine. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 11, 2000

"No surprises; the usual conservative diet fare, spiced by the Duchess's starry presence."
That old reliable—the standard, well-based Weight Watchers' weight-control plan—is enlivened by vignettes from the organization's spokeswoman, the Duchess of York (Dining With the Duchess, not reviewed). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >