Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 52)

FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 1, 2001

"A charming little gift for an inquisitive cook."
An admiring account of an exotic spice with a long and varied history, by a food writer whose imagination keeps the story light and lively. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 1, 2001

"Bon appetit to readers who agree with that rather sweeping statement; even those who don't will enjoy the cheerful anecdotes and the memorable dishes. (photos, not seen)"
A restaurant critic and food writer's engaging recollections: part memoir, part cookbook. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 12, 2001

"Reichl (who 'raced through electric streets' in Thailand) likes it in the fast track—but she has a tendency to hog the lane to herself."
More memoirs from Gourmet editor Reichl (Tender at the Bone, 1998, etc.), highly focused (on the food world of Berkeley, New York, and Los Angeles in the 1970s and '80s) and grindingly self-absorbed. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 2001

"Vividly told, full of striking detail, and utterly fascinating."
The shift from hunting to farming is a major watershed in human history. Here, an anthropologist describes the worldview of surviving hunting cultures. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 1, 2001

"Surprisingly thought-provoking and original table talk from the academy."
Perhaps the ultimate refutation to anyone claiming there is a single, simple answer to the question of why France invented and continues to set the world standard for haute cuisine.Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 19, 2001

"Despite an early arc to the narrative, this renders an engaging portrayal through its author's detailed, sensitive writing and apparent affection for his subject."
This moving foray into the world of restaurateuring in modern America proves that cuisine is as crucial to 20th-century history as technology, rock music, and television. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 17, 2001

"An exemplary blend of polemic and journalism, guaranteed to put you off your lunch."
A tale full of sound, fury, and popping grease. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Initially solid case study of American business degenerates into a vanity publication."
A fawning biography of the restaurateur who brought glitzy haute cuisine to New York. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"A smart, engaging history of the uses of, attitudes toward, and wars over the world's most mysterious plant. (Illustrations throughout)"
From ancient, South American, meter-long cigars (and you thought Cheech and Chong rolled big) to modern Chinese teenagers lighting up because it "looks cool," a fast-paced, comprehensive look at tobacco and its consumers. Read full book review >
BEST FOOD WRITING 2000 by Holly Hughes
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"Plenty of satisfying entrees here, but next year the editor should try to provide some more adventurous fare as well."
The debut of a planned annual collection, this stellar selection of mostly American food writing has everything but the unexpected. Read full book review >
AMERICAN VINTAGE by Paul Lukacs
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 16, 2000

"There is currently a debate in wine circles about whether all bottles of wine need to breathe. But there is little debate that American winemaking history has had sufficient aeration—with the result that the subject is getting flat."
The history of American winemaking, by now pretty well-turned ground, gets a further spading from Washington Times wine columnist Lukacs. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"Highly satisfying."
A clear-eyed, affectionate exploration of traditional cuisine's place in the culture and politics of an ever-changing France. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >