Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 52)

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 2, 1994

"Makes one grateful not to be a country boy."
This unappealing, disorganized, catastrophe of a cookbook paints an unhealthy picture of country fare. Read full book review >
THE INDIAN VEGETARIAN by Neelam Batra
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A mystique breaker."
Indian cuisine still sounds exotic to many people and has yet to work its way into American kitchens. Read full book review >

ELVIS IN HOLLYWOOD by Elizabeth McKeon
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Still, a perfect gag gift."
Elvis's infamous fondness for down-home southern cooking (breakfasts of sausage, bacon, and eggs; lunches of mashed potatoes with gravy, sauerkraut, bacon, and biscuits; dinners of fried chicken; fried peanut-butter-and-banana sandwiches for snacks) makes this less a cookbook than a campy tribute to white-trash cuisine and a ``memory book'' (as freelance writer McKeon likes to call it) of the King's days in Hollywood. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 14, 1994

"In all, provocative and accomplished."
Stacey, a magazine journalist, contends that Americans have become paranoid about food, especially about fat, and that our fears have taken the pleasure out of eating. Read full book review >
HARD TO SWALLOW by Richard W. Lacey
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1994

"British by birth but quite adaptable to American readers."
Charming, delightful, often richly depressing survey about what we eat, by Lacey (Medical Microbiology/Leeds;Unsafe for Human Consumption—not reviewed). Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1994

"Serious anthropology but also much like a long night out, expenses paid."
An assistant professor in the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University, Allison worked as a hostess in a Tokyo club, where she examined how the rituals of a hostess define gender identities in Japan. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1994

"And he explains how the others are grounded in the cuisine he knows and does best. (Book-of-the-Month- Club Alternate Selection)"
Franey, recently retired from his New York Times and syndicated food column, looks back with clarity, precision, and considerable charm on his Burgundy childhood in a food-centered family; his rigorous training in Paris eateries (after leaving home and school forever at 14); and his American career as a French chef making his name in restaurant kitchens, newspaper columns, cookbooks, and television series. ``Anyone who has ever tried to cook well knows that about 50 percent of the job is focus, the willingness to concentrate,'' Franey notes. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

The author (Two Acre Eden, 1971) has written a good deal about farming in books and articles, and these essays (1980-92) were written, by Logsdon's own admission, ``out of anger'' at the decline of rural society, the result, he believes, of ``a nation's greed.'' Here he targets some root causes—from educational, media and governmental malfeasances. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 14, 1994

"The writing—polished, clever, and aptly targeted to GQ—is stylish nibble more than sustaining substance."
Food, sex, and other thoughts. Read full book review >
SEEDS OF CHANGE by Kenny Ausubel
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"The writing is overwrought, the tone self-righteous, and much of the content self-serving—yet this offers information too important for readers to let these, and other irritations, stand in their way. (Twelve b&w and 60 color photographs—not seen)"
The critically important—and interesting—story of the threat to earth's biodiversity and how this endangers us all, told by the founder of Seeds of Change, the country's leading organic seed producer. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

From Canadian publisher de Villiers (Down the Volga, 1992, etc.): a fruity, complex story of a California winemaker—a tale much like crushed raspberries on a summer's day, with a heartbreaking, underlying silkiness and a faint hint of fresh farm butter. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Highly detailed—a must for students of Soviet, or social, history."
Scholarly and poignant account of conditions in Russia's collective farms in the 30's. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >