Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 53)

MAPPING THE FARM by John Hildebrand
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 12, 1995

"A less than gripping account of a farm family muddling its way through the century as tradition gives way to compromise. (8 pages photos, not seen)"
The 115-year history of a family farm reveals few skeletons, too many sidetracks, and the decline of an American institution. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 1995

"This slim book's surprising strength accrues line by line in Brox's keen observation and spare, poetic prose."
Aging parents and a troubled, ne'er-do-well brother draw Brox home to the family farm in the Merrimack Valley of Massachusetts, where she confronts an age-old dilemma: the conflict between familial duty and the need to live one's own life. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: June 1, 1995

"And if the house wins in this instance, Raeburn provocatively concludes, the result will be starvation."
A well-reasoned, timely call for American agriculture to recognize that putting eggs in a single basket can lead to disaster. Read full book review >
EVER AFTER by William Wharton
FOOD & COOKING
Released: June 1, 1995

"Wharton's ordeal is not easy reading, but his persistence in assailing the woeful cause for it is highly admirable."
A piercing cry from the heart, a resounding call for reform — and that rare thing: a unique book. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 3, 1995

"A well-rounded endeavor to help round off meals."
Restaurant owner and chef Phillips (Working a Duck, not reviewed) brings together old favorites and newfangled inventions in this very polished and helpful volume. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 1, 1995

"Maybe she should have looked at the landscape after all. (b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Harmless profiles of Napa Valley residents, mostly folks involved in the wine business, from freelancer Barron. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 1, 1995

"More than family history or mere coming-of-age memoir, Fish's first effort is a wise, clearheaded look back at a more selfless era that stressed community needs over individualism."
A sober, reflective inquiry into morality and values as practiced and passed down by six generations on a Vermont family farm. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 1, 1995

"Sweet, but so light it melts into air."
Tales from the Finger Lake countryside: gentle and folksy, but without much humor or insight. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 24, 1995

"Codependent recipes render this book dysfunctional."
Schloss and Bookman (Fifty Ways to Cook Most Everything, not reviewed) have a firm vision of what we eat todaythey just don't understand how we cook it. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 15, 1995

Shore and Townsend, the associate directors of Share Our Strength (a hunger-relief organization that will receive all authors' proceeds), have come up with a more sensible version of the fancy star-chef book by asking 44 of America's finest chefs to create menus that reflect the way they cook for themselves on their nights off. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 1, 1995

"Not thorough enough to be a definitive book on the subject, but a good, glossy overview."
Hayes and Leblang follow up their successful Rice (not reviewed) and Beans (not reviewed) with some advice on how to make those ``amber waves of grain'' into something special. Read full book review >
FATHER ORSINI'S PASTA PERFECTA by Joseph Orsini
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 23, 1995

That Orsini (Father Orsini's Italian Kitchen, not reviewed), a retired priest and the self-proclaimed ``pope of pasta,'' hails from Bayonne, N.J., still doesn't explain some of the culinary inaccuracies in this amateur take on Italy's regional cuisines. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >