Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 53)

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 24, 2002

"What Napa was, what it is, where it's going: Conaway weighs them in the balance, and shudders."
Visions and desires clash memorably in the bottle green valley of the Napa River. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 2002

"Here's whatever is worth knowing about Romanoff and Petrossian and the remarkable history of beluga, osetra, or sevruga eggs, all in this one basket, served with much style."
An experienced hand in Eastern Europe and Russia, now architecture critic for the Philadelphia Inquirer, reports extensively on a snack for the well-heeled that used to come from Russia with, if not love, then much salt. Her text surveys the art, science and lore of sturgeon roe: caviar, of course. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 7, 2002

"Both amusing and dismaying. (8 pages color, 45 b&w illustrations, some not seen)"
A witty, acerbic, and, for those women who grew up in the mid-20th century, painful review of the social and marketplace pressures that reduced women to "soft, delicate, nurturing beings made of ‘sugar and spice and everything nice.' " Read full book review >
VEGETARIANISM by Colin Spencer
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"A capable blend of dietary, religious, and political history that will please like-minded readers—but perhaps prompt contrarians to cook up a cheeseburger, rare."
Would the world be a better place if humans stopped eating things with faces? Indubitably, asserts English food-writer Spencer in this lively if sometimes debatable treatise. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 16, 2002

"This is advice? Why drink mediocre (or worse) wine at all?"
A rather unhelpful introduction to wine from Beardsall, a wine professional, that may well leave neophytes with more confusions and doubts than when they started. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2002

"An inviting and edifying introduction to the improvers, who 'offered an opposite kind of change from the blaze and shift of nineteenth-century America.'"
An engaging examination of the early proponents of restorative husbandry—their origins, motivations, and how their ideas played out—from Yale historian Stoll. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2002

"The tenacity and availability of life, amply admired and admirably evoked."
From newcomer Foster, a keen and wholly lovely catalogue of seasons growing spuds in the midst of swells. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2002

"Extremely broad, frustratingly shallow."
A stroll through the history of some food taboos that have caught the author's fancy, loosely organized around the seven deadly sins. Read full book review >
BREAKING CLEAN by Judy Blunt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 12, 2002

"Profound, and profoundly moving."
A memoir of growing up a cattleman's daughter in northeastern Montana in the 1950s and '60s. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"Ultimately, then, it's not about the food, it's about the chef and author: a high-maintenance gent, brash, insightful, a jokester, and certainly someone you wouldn't want by your side at a touchy border crossing."
Over-the-top and highly diverting international culinary adventures, always to be taken with a generous grain of salt—and make it Fleur de Sel—and best consumed a bite at a time. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Of interest only to food activists and organic-gardening buffs—who are probably already converts to the cause."
The pleasures are few, the politics plenty, in this preachy treatise on the politically correct production and consumption of food. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Delightful in small doses, but too intense to be consumed in a single sitting."
Novelist Harrison (The Beast God Forgot to Invent, 2000, etc.), a man of firm opinions and titanic appetites, here collects his previously published essays on food. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >