Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 53)

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Delightful in small doses, but too intense to be consumed in a single sitting."
Novelist Harrison (The Beast God Forgot to Invent, 2000, etc.), a man of firm opinions and titanic appetites, here collects his previously published essays on food. Read full book review >
A SHORT HISTORY OF WINE by Rod Phillips
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"A laudably compact and versed telling of wine's story."
A limpid overview nestles wine—that most charged and symbolic of foods—within its historical and cultural contexts. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Nicely balancing recent encyclopedic treatments such as the Cambridge World History of Food, Rebora's slender volume should be of interest to foodies, cookbook collectors, and historians alike."
A lively stroll through (mostly southern) European culinary history. Read full book review >
STANDING UP TO THE ROCK by T. Louise Freeman-Toole
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 17, 2001

"Freeman-Toole's voice is easy on the ear, and her stories have that clear, sere quality that marks the land she came to love. (16 photographs)"
Warm yet unsentimental engagements with a cattle ranch on the Palouse. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 16, 2001

"Informative, comprehensive—but burdened by gee-whiz insights into the ways of the world."
An American writer details her infatuation with French bread, in a part-reportage and part-earnest attempt to understand national differences and obsessions. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 2001

A corrective to Frankenfood alarmists: Genetic engineering of plants and animals has been going on for millennia, thanks to humankind's tinkering. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 11, 2001

"And would she ever make them proud in these pages. Emotionally luxurious and heart-gladdening. (22 photos)"
Novelist/essayist Volk (White Light, not reviewed) pens a stylishly written memoir that's really a series of portraits of the memorable characters who make up her extended family. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"An original and impressive presentation that does much to illuminate the current racial situation."
Lasch-Quinn (History/Syracuse Univ.) contends that the civil-rights movement has been hurt by its advocacy of diversity training, multicultural education, and other therapeutic programs that have failed to tackle the intractable problems of poverty and violence. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Like a good newspaperman, Prial deploys his nose for the story before taking in the bouquet."
Unlike Rod Phillips (see above), New York Times wine critic Prial can be both stiff and fawning, but he brings to his reporting two invaluable qualities: he's been on the beat for 30 years, and he keeps an eye skinned for the beat less beaten. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"All in all, a pleasure for foodies, and a satisfying read for students of world history as well."
Historian Fernández-Armesto sinks his teeth into the role of food in human history. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2001

"A fine treat for food buffs, less snotty than Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential but just as revealing on how a fancy meal makes it way to the table."
Fine dining, politics, and a host of strange characters meet in this engaging, behind-the-scenes look at one of New York's hippest restaurants. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 15, 2001

"An engrossing addition to the popular literature of WWII—and a treat for oenophiles as well."
Vin ordinaire goes to war—and lives to tell the tale. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >