Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 53)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

"An attractive mise en place, but one that lacks the simple artistry of that long-remembered potato."
A writer enters the Culinary Institute of America, the Ivy League of cooking schools. Read full book review >
THE PARTY by Sally Quinn
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 5, 1997

"Go to Miss Manners for a useful guide to party giving or to almost any celebrity bio for better anecdotes about parties-I- have-known. (b&w illustrations)"
Trite, trivial, and tasteless describe this unrewarding effort of a society reporter, novelist, and ``sometime Washington hostess.'' That latter label horrified Quinn (Happy Endings, 1991) when she heard it aplied to her on Good Morning America. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Despite its moments, this autobiography is clunky, desperately self-promoting, and, at best, premature."
In case you were interested, here's everything you could ever possibly want to know about Robinson's (Oxford Companion to Wine) career trajectory. Read full book review >
APPETITE FOR LIFE by Noel Riley Fitch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"An exhaustively researched, charming story of a life well lived, and an admiring portrait of a good marriage."
Riley (Anaãs: The Erotic Life of Anaãs Nin, 1993, etc.) offers a loving, overstuffed biography of the cook from Pasadena who introduced French cooking to the American kitchen. Read full book review >
STORIES FROM THE ROUND BARN by Jacqueline Dougan Jackson
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Jackson finds little gems in the muck and toil of farming life. (photos, not seen)"
Delicately filigreed vignettes of a Wisconsin farm life from children's-book author Jackson. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 18, 1997

"Though this is unsatisfying as a skim-milk latte in places, Schultz is less a braggart and more a true believer than many CEOs, and (with Business Week staffer Yang) he provides a pleasing read. ($300,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
A chatty history of Starbucks by its CEO, who announces that he considers the company to be only in its third chapter (which is nowhere near the eleventh). Read full book review >
MIRIAM'S KITCHEN by Elizabeth Ehrlich
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"It is a savory stew made from the social and cultural ingredients of American-Jewish life. (Author tour)"
An appealing, sensitive account of an assimilated Jewish woman's efforts to embrace the religious traditions of her ancestors. Read full book review >
COD by Mark Kurlansky
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

Cod—that whitest of the white-fleshed fish, prize of every fish-and-chips establishment—gets expert, loving, and encyclopedic handling from Food and Wine columnist Kurlansky (A Chosen Few: The Resurrection of European Jewry, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1997

"An appealing and often amusing history of a less-than-noble drink, written with style and a genuine appreciation for the good old days before Miller Time went global. (Author tour)"
An industry insider's account of how B-school grads with no brew experience became the nation's tastemakers. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: June 1, 1997

"The food writing isn't quite as nourishing as that of Calvin Trillin, Waverly Root, or A.J. Liebling (to whom Stevens pays appropriate respect); it's more of a lark in the Bertie Wooster mode, and cosmopolitan to a fault."
Stevens, political consultant and author of whimsical travelogues (Malaria Dreams, 1989, etc.), accepts the formidable challenge of dining in all 29 of the Michelin three-star restaurants in Europe on consecutive nights, and lives to tell the story. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1997

"Inevitably, just a bit gaseous. ($30,000 ad/promo; TV satellite tour)"
That guy in the bib overalls who shows up on TV on Sunday mornings offers a tongue-in-cheek celebration of the larger meaning of the comestibles he likes. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1997

"Many of the foods here are obscure, but this delicious etymological feast will satiate anyone who enjoys the taste of words."
A contributing editor to Allure and the author of A Garden of Words (not reviewed), Barnette uses her background in classical languages to inform and delight the reader by tracing the whimsical manner in which food names found their way to our lexical pantries. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >