Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 53)

DRINK by Andrew Barr
Released: March 1, 1999

An exploration of American drinking habits through time from a British scholar of booze. Read full book review >
SEASONING by David Young
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"An elegant pot-au-feu of days, sensual and heart-gladdening."
A soulful and sage calendar of monthly associations—"things of place seen in time"—from poet Young. Read full book review >

Released: Dec. 2, 1998

"Such is the unadorned pleasure of Edmunds's book, its rare scholarly intimacy, that there can be little doubt that he delighted in his fieldwork very much. (illustrations, not seen)"
Few drinks achieve such complex and ambiguous symbolism as the martini, and likely few writers could decode it as well as the polished Edmunds (Classics/Rutgers Univ.). Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 14, 1998

"A fascinating portrait of an invisible class and an evocative mandate for social change. (34 b&w photos, not seen)"
You'll never again take the produce on your supermarket shelf for granted after reading this illuminating account. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Values wrapped in a warm fuzzy."
Homilies delivered in a gently humorous voice but with a serious undertone by a Presbyterian preacher not afraid to reveal his own humanity. Read full book review >

HARVEST SON by David Mas Masumoto
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"But ill-arranged slices of life do not a memoir make. (Author tour)"
The richness of Masumoto's earlier memoir (Epitaph for a Peach, 1995) about life as a Japanese-American farmer in California is generally lacking here. Read full book review >
Released: July 1, 1998

"Among a sprawl of books incessantly issued and hyped, this small, wise volume quietly calls us to read and be renewed. (50 color photos)"
Lyrical tale of the survival and triumph of a small farm amid the suburban sprawl of southern California, with writing as rich and satisfying as the taste of a ripe melon. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 1998

"As always, Miss Manners provides what one 'gentle reader' calls her 'polite, succinct and effective rejoinders.'"
In the second entry in her "Basic Training" series, Miss Manners, with her usual wit and graciousness, instructs us in how to respond to awkward, embarrassing, or just downright rude comments from others. Read full book review >
Released: March 23, 1998

"Lang's wartime experiences were horrifying, but his book is mainly a lighthearted celebration of good friends, good food, and the good life he's found in the culinary world. (40 b&w photos, not seen)"
International restaurateur Lang takes stock of his life's path from small-town Hungary to the summits of world dining—and has fun along the way. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 1998

"A perfectly balanced stew of memories: not too sweet, not too tart. (First printing of 40,000; author tour)"
The restaurant critic of the New York Times whips up a savory memoir of her apprentice years. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"So much to inspire; too much to summarize."
Her cunning as a culinary essayist, memoirist, and fiction writer won't fully prepare Fisher's many fans for her gusto as an informal correspondent. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 15, 1997

"The 20 illustrations include contemporary photos of White Castle outlets and the company's early advertisements."
A scholar's lively account of how White Castle, now a largely overlooked but still profitable also-ran in the domestic restaurant trade, made the once-scorned hamburger a US institution and launched the fast-food industry. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >