Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 54)

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"A must for both Java junkies and travel lovers. (Author tour)"
Chef-turned-journalist Allen's debut book is a thoroughly entertaining, absorbing, and often hilarious jaunt through the history and geography of coffee. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 1, 1999

"Should be read by anyone curious about what goes into their daily cup of Java—too often, good coffee isn't good for the people who produce it. (60 b&w photos) (Author tour)"
An exhaustive, admirably ambitious examination of coffee's global impact, from its roots in 15th-century Ethiopia to its critical role in shaping the nations of Central and Latin America. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 6, 1999

"Even dieters will be unable to resist this gourmet repast on American culture."
A witty and sumptuous pantry-level look at the struggle to create an American cuisine. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 1999

"This is quite beautiful music, the sound of a family's life that keeps ringing in a daughter's ears."
A lovely and melancholy history of her family and its farm, a holdout in the soil-poor Northeast, from Brox (Here and Nowhere Else: Late Seasons of a Farm and Its Family, 1995). Read full book review >
DRINK by Andrew Barr
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 1, 1999

An exploration of American drinking habits through time from a British scholar of booze. Read full book review >

SEASONING by David Young
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"An elegant pot-au-feu of days, sensual and heart-gladdening."
A soulful and sage calendar of monthly associations—"things of place seen in time"—from poet Young. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Dec. 2, 1998

"Such is the unadorned pleasure of Edmunds's book, its rare scholarly intimacy, that there can be little doubt that he delighted in his fieldwork very much. (illustrations, not seen)"
Few drinks achieve such complex and ambiguous symbolism as the martini, and likely few writers could decode it as well as the polished Edmunds (Classics/Rutgers Univ.). Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 14, 1998

"A fascinating portrait of an invisible class and an evocative mandate for social change. (34 b&w photos, not seen)"
You'll never again take the produce on your supermarket shelf for granted after reading this illuminating account. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Values wrapped in a warm fuzzy."
Homilies delivered in a gently humorous voice but with a serious undertone by a Presbyterian preacher not afraid to reveal his own humanity. Read full book review >
HARVEST SON by David Mas Masumoto
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"But ill-arranged slices of life do not a memoir make. (Author tour)"
The richness of Masumoto's earlier memoir (Epitaph for a Peach, 1995) about life as a Japanese-American farmer in California is generally lacking here. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: July 1, 1998

"Among a sprawl of books incessantly issued and hyped, this small, wise volume quietly calls us to read and be renewed. (50 color photos)"
Lyrical tale of the survival and triumph of a small farm amid the suburban sprawl of southern California, with writing as rich and satisfying as the taste of a ripe melon. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 1, 1998

"As always, Miss Manners provides what one 'gentle reader' calls her 'polite, succinct and effective rejoinders.'"
In the second entry in her "Basic Training" series, Miss Manners, with her usual wit and graciousness, instructs us in how to respond to awkward, embarrassing, or just downright rude comments from others. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >