Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 54)

FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 1, 1996

"So today does Wendell Berry, alongside whose agrarian essays this intriguing book should be shelved."
An unusually literate work, at once paean and dirge, on the decline of family farming, which also happens to mark ``the end of a historical cycle in America.'' Hanson (The Western Way of War, 1989) is both a professor of Greek and a farmer in the Central Valley of California. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"This testimonial to the capacity of the human spirit to resist, to endure, and eventually to overcome oppression may well prove to be a key document of South African history. (32 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A sprawling biography of one of the people whom history usually forgets: an illiterate black South African sharecropper who lived out his days under apartheid. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 5, 1996

Portrait of the actor as a young gourmand. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 15, 1995

"Like a drunken spree: not without its pleasures, but sloppy and apt to lead to misunderstandings. (15 b&w photos, not seen)"
The meaning of mixed drinks, served by pop culture historian Lanza with a twist when it might better have been offered neat. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 26, 1995

"The Stork and the Plow is a good place to start."
The Ehrlichs, older and less doctrinaire than in their Population Explosion (1990) days, are guardedly hopeful that resources (the plow) can sustain population gains (the stork) in the century ahead. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"In the end, the reader learns more here about the spirit of Arthur Waskow than of authentic Jewish beliefs."
A sincere but overly idiosyncratic guide for those who are disenchanted with more traditional Judaism. Read full book review >
DREAM REAPER by Craig Canine
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"While Canine sometimes dwells too lovingly on the nuts and bolts, this is less a story of a machine and far more an insightful look at the creative mind. (35 illustrations, not seen)"
Canine, a magazine writer and descendant of Iowa farmers, writes a surprisingly lively and suspenseful account of two Kansans who invent and attempt to successfully market an innovative farm combine. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: June 19, 1995

"Full of good sense and good reportage, Mather's book deserves wide attention. (author tour)"
If the thought of a farm straight out of Woody Allen's Sleeper, overrun with mammoth chickens and gargantuan vegetables, scares you, then this book will fuel a thousand nightmares. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 16, 1995

"Mas Masumoto has a nice touch and charming perspective."
In this lovingly rendered account, the author describes his efforts to maintain his unique organic farm and to find a market for his juicy but unpopular fruit. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 12, 1995

"A delectable tale artfully told."
The vastly entertaining account of a Burgundian chef's rise to Guide Michelin three-stardom. Read full book review >
MAPPING THE FARM by John Hildebrand
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 12, 1995

"A less than gripping account of a farm family muddling its way through the century as tradition gives way to compromise. (8 pages photos, not seen)"
The 115-year history of a family farm reveals few skeletons, too many sidetracks, and the decline of an American institution. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 1995

"This slim book's surprising strength accrues line by line in Brox's keen observation and spare, poetic prose."
Aging parents and a troubled, ne'er-do-well brother draw Brox home to the family farm in the Merrimack Valley of Massachusetts, where she confronts an age-old dilemma: the conflict between familial duty and the need to live one's own life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >