Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 55)

NOBODY KNOWS THE TRUFFLES I'VE SEEN by George Lang
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 23, 1998

"Lang's wartime experiences were horrifying, but his book is mainly a lighthearted celebration of good friends, good food, and the good life he's found in the culinary world. (40 b&w photos, not seen)"
International restaurateur Lang takes stock of his life's path from small-town Hungary to the summits of world dining—and has fun along the way. Read full book review >
TENDER AT THE BONE by Ruth Reichl
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1998

"A perfectly balanced stew of memories: not too sweet, not too tart. (First printing of 40,000; author tour)"
The restaurant critic of the New York Times whips up a savory memoir of her apprentice years. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"So much to inspire; too much to summarize."
Her cunning as a culinary essayist, memoirist, and fiction writer won't fully prepare Fisher's many fans for her gusto as an informal correspondent. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 15, 1997

"The 20 illustrations include contemporary photos of White Castle outlets and the company's early advertisements."
A scholar's lively account of how White Castle, now a largely overlooked but still profitable also-ran in the domestic restaurant trade, made the once-scorned hamburger a US institution and launched the fast-food industry. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

"An attractive mise en place, but one that lacks the simple artistry of that long-remembered potato."
A writer enters the Culinary Institute of America, the Ivy League of cooking schools. Read full book review >

THE PARTY by Sally Quinn
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 5, 1997

"Go to Miss Manners for a useful guide to party giving or to almost any celebrity bio for better anecdotes about parties-I- have-known. (b&w illustrations)"
Trite, trivial, and tasteless describe this unrewarding effort of a society reporter, novelist, and ``sometime Washington hostess.'' That latter label horrified Quinn (Happy Endings, 1991) when she heard it aplied to her on Good Morning America. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Despite its moments, this autobiography is clunky, desperately self-promoting, and, at best, premature."
In case you were interested, here's everything you could ever possibly want to know about Robinson's (Oxford Companion to Wine) career trajectory. Read full book review >
APPETITE FOR LIFE by Noel Riley Fitch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"An exhaustively researched, charming story of a life well lived, and an admiring portrait of a good marriage."
Riley (Anaãs: The Erotic Life of Anaãs Nin, 1993, etc.) offers a loving, overstuffed biography of the cook from Pasadena who introduced French cooking to the American kitchen. Read full book review >
STORIES FROM THE ROUND BARN by Jacqueline Dougan Jackson
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Jackson finds little gems in the muck and toil of farming life. (photos, not seen)"
Delicately filigreed vignettes of a Wisconsin farm life from children's-book author Jackson. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 18, 1997

"Though this is unsatisfying as a skim-milk latte in places, Schultz is less a braggart and more a true believer than many CEOs, and (with Business Week staffer Yang) he provides a pleasing read. ($300,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
A chatty history of Starbucks by its CEO, who announces that he considers the company to be only in its third chapter (which is nowhere near the eleventh). Read full book review >
MIRIAM'S KITCHEN by Elizabeth Ehrlich
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"It is a savory stew made from the social and cultural ingredients of American-Jewish life. (Author tour)"
An appealing, sensitive account of an assimilated Jewish woman's efforts to embrace the religious traditions of her ancestors. Read full book review >
COD by Mark Kurlansky
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

Cod—that whitest of the white-fleshed fish, prize of every fish-and-chips establishment—gets expert, loving, and encyclopedic handling from Food and Wine columnist Kurlansky (A Chosen Few: The Resurrection of European Jewry, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >