Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 55)

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Whether or not you buy into this version of the Gallo story, it's a family saga with all the makings of a television miniseries: adversity, intrigue, tragedy, manipulation, greed, and a slick presentation. (60 b&w photos, not seen)"
Though the Gallos' wines might repulse you and their reputation give you the willies, their autobiography is worth a look, if only to get another side of the picture. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Nostalgia food for aging hippies and homesick Yalies."
Criscuolo, owner since 1975 of a vegetarian restaurant in New Haven, Conn., has waited too long to put out this cookbook, and that is both compliment and criticism. Read full book review >

THE NOODLE SHOP COOKBOOK by Jacki Passmore
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Far above Spaghetti-Os but not quite up to Tampopo standards on the noodle achievement scale. (14 illustrations, not seen)"
Passmore (Asia the Beautiful Cookbook, not reviewed) was inspired to put together this group of Asian noodle recipes when she left Hong Kong and experienced ``noodle withdrawal,'' and she has done a bang-up job of collecting and replicating dishes. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"As easy and delicious as a long-simmered stock."
As the author notes, chicken soup makes an appearance in the cuisine of virtually every country in the world as a cure for everything from colds to political unrest. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 31, 1994

"Too little art, too little science."
This generic cookbook alters old favorites slightly and then tries to pass them off as newfangled. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 24, 1994

"Tea may soothe, but Stoddard will drive you crazy with her self-conscious, precious drivel. (Illustrations, not seen)"
Stoddard (Creating a Beautiful Home, not reviewed) makes some amazing claims about the healing powers of tea in this overwrought little book that focuses less on cooking than on personal memoir, entertaining hints, and egregiously inane aphorisms. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 20, 1994

One of the factors keeping vegetarian eating from going completely mainstream is the amount of time required to cook whole foods. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 17, 1994

"A good book to wake up with."
Taking his cue from the age-old adage that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, Haedrich (Home for the Holidays, not reviewed, etc.) crafts a mostly basic cookbook—with a few unique recipes—in easy-to-follow prose. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 12, 1994

"Others will find it indigestible."
Pedestrian mini-biographies of three women who are household names among members of the Cuisinart set. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 11, 1994

"A multicultural mess."
Children's book author Medear°s has bitten off more than she can chew in trying to cover Africa and the Caribbean as well as early and modern African-American cooking. Read full book review >
JANE BRODY'S GOOD SEAFOOD BOOK by Jane Brody
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

Health and nutrition writer Brody (Jane Brody's Good Food Gourmet, 1990, etc.) and frequent cookbook coauthor Flaste sticks with her credo of ``low in fat, high in flavor''—this time casting a line for succulent, nutrient-dense, low-calorie seafood. Read full book review >
THE VEGETARIAN TABLE by Julia della Croce
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Nothing new under the sun."
This initial entry in an international vegetarian series disproves the myth that vegetarian cooking is always light and healthy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >