Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 8)

A FARM DIES ONCE A YEAR by Arlo Crawford
Released: April 1, 2014

"Most interesting to aspiring organic farmers."
A down-to-earth account of life on New Morning Farm, to which Crawford, the rather aimless son of the owners, returned for one season, searching for some direction in his own unsatisfactory life. Read full book review >
SOUS CHEF by Michael Gibney
Released: March 25, 2014

"Sumptuously entertaining fare."
An experienced sous chef and first-time author skillfully deconstructs a 24-hour work cycle of a sous chef in a New York kitchen. Read full book review >

HARVEST by Max Watman
Released: March 24, 2014

"With an essayist's flair for careful description, this is an entertaining, if not eye-opening, look at one man's passion for the pleasures of the table. Recommended as a congenial overview of homespun ideals."
Hudson Valley writer Watman (Chasing the White Dog: An Amateur Outlaw's Adventures in Moonshine, 2010) charts his adventures in sourcing or producing whole foods in more direct ways, without the polemical emphasis on locavore movements, environmental politics, corporate agriculture or related issues. Read full book review >
MY USUAL TABLE by Colman Andrews
Released: March 18, 2014

"'My problem, of course, was that I was a decade or so ahead of the times.' That's not the only one."
A stroll down Memory Lane, with stops at the eateries that have shaped him, from food writer Andrews (The Taste of America, 2013, etc.). Read full book review >
EARTH ESSENCE by Helmut Norbert Taferner
Released: March 7, 2014

"A hearty and savory collection, with a few sweet delights thrown in."
A collection of healthy alternatives to traditional comfort food. Read full book review >

Released: March 4, 2014

"Thorough research provides fascinating insight into the sweet business of maple syrup."
An inside look at the maple syrup industry. Read full book review >
THE MEAT RACKET by Christopher Leonard
Released: Feb. 18, 2014

"An authoritative look at a ruthlessly efficient system."
An engrossing report on the industrialized American meat business. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 18, 2014

"A lively, informative look at the transformative potential of a mission-driven niche industry."
Marketer, management scholar and journalist Dobrow chronicles how natural and organic foods were transformed from the pursuit of a few idealists to a thriving, multibillion-dollar industry. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 11, 2014

"Regardless of readers' culinary proclivities, Martin's lively book poses timely questions while offering tasty solutions."
Digging into the latest culinary trend, "entomophagist," or bug-eating expert, Martin expounds upon the "ecological, nutritional, economic, global and culinary" benefits of consuming insects. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 31, 2014

"A look at traditional Chinese medicine's ability to protect against food allergies that could generate considerable buzz in the medical community."
This detailed scientific analysis puts traditional Chinese medicine forward as a strong contender for treating food allergies. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 16, 2014

"A new, colorful angle on eating food from the earth."
In this spiritually minded cookbook, Dennis and food writer Lyons (The New EBONY Cookbook, 1999)argue that the colors of the foods we eat can balance our moods, improve our deficiencies and enhance our overall well-being. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 14, 2014

"Marshall's clear, direct book ably captures the frustrations of trying to find the healthiest path and inspiring kids to do the same."
Teaching kids "to learn the simple pleasures of the table and to appreciate the taste of real food." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >