Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 8)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"For readers with a strong interest in environmental and public health and food safety policy, this may be one of the most important books of the year."
A thorough examination of industrial chemicals in our food chain by an acclaimed French journalist and documentary filmmaker. Read full book review >
THE AMERICAN PLATE by Libby H. O'Connell
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"O'Connell is a perky companion for this buffet of historical snacks."
History Channel and A&E Networks chief historian O'Connell uses food to chronicle the history of the United States. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Quietly uplifting reading."
A socially conscious Episcopalian priest's account of how and why she started the Thistle Stop Café, a Nashville teahouse that employs females recovering from violence and drug abuse. Read full book review >
MEET PARIS OYSTER by Mireille Guiliano
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"A somewhat fluffy and affected introduction to mostly French oyster consumption."
Another instructive fantasy of French luxury lifestyles from former Veuve Clicquot CEO and best-selling author Guiliano (French Women Don't Get Facelifts, 2013, etc.).Read full book review >
BEST FOOD WRITING 2014 by Holly Hughes
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"Consistent in quality and enthusiasm, Hughes again delivers a cornucopia of varietal amusements for foodophiles whose palates crave invigorating interpretations and perspectives."
The 14th installment of a series known for dynamic, immersive food writing. Read full book review >

CHOP SUEY, USA by Yong Chen
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"A well-researched study of Chinese-American food, the people who brought it to our neighborhoods and how Americans grew to love it."
Chen (History/Univ. of California, Irvine; Chinese San Francisco, 1850-1943: A Trans-Pacific Community, 2000) shows how enterprising immigrants turned Chinese food, reviled by 19th-century Americans, into one of the country's favorite ethnic meals. Read full book review >
THE CHAIN by Ted Genoways
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"The author tells a sad, horrifying story, a severe indictment of both corporate greed and consumer complacency."
A scathing report on the consequences of factory farming. Read full book review >
COME HERE OFTEN? by Sean Manning
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A delightful collection that will surely inspire many bar-hopping tours."
Writers share anecdotes and reminiscences about their favorite bars from around the world. Read full book review >
DARE TO PAIR by Julie Pech
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A useful, enjoyable read about the restrained debauchery of consuming chocolate with the fruit of the vine."
A concise guide to the art of pairing chocolate dishes with various types of wines. Read full book review >
THE BREWER'S TALE by William Bostwick
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 13, 2014

"Bostwick's beercentric account of the world will delight beer lovers, food historians and home brewers."
The often dry topic of world history becomes a jovial and well-lubricated trek through time and place in this narrative detailing the origins of beer. Read full book review >
EAT MORE BETTER by Dan Pashman
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 4, 2014

"A good-natured, clever and informative romp through the modern culinary landscape."
The creator and host of WNYC's podcast The Sporkful develops a humorous, witty narrative delivered in the form of a pseudo-textbook. Read full book review >
BAKE YOURSELF HAPPY by Norma Borelli
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 2, 2014

"Despite a few flaws, this cookie cookbook is worth a try, though unwary readers may gain 5 pounds just looking."
Baking cookies as therapy? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >