Food & Cooking Book Reviews (page 9)

Released: March 9, 2015

"Provocative though unlikely to reach far beyond the choir box."
A condemnatory look at the factory-farming model that has overpopulated the planet with too many cattle, to the detriment of all involved. Read full book review >
Released: March 3, 2015

"Poignant, heartwarming and generously filled with delicious recipes."
An award-winning blogger and MFK Fisher scholar's account of how food not only came to define a difficult childhood, but also became the way she was able to heal her past. Read full book review >

THE JOY OF REAL FOOD by Rowena Jayne
Released: Feb. 4, 2015

"An often engaging book that offers original ways to bring variety to daily meal preparation—even for readers who aren't ready to commit to a raw-food, vegan lifestyle."
This brightly illustrated, eclectic compilation of vegan recipes urges readers to find joy by changing unhealthful culinary habits. Read full book review >
BON APPÉTEMPT by Amelia Morris
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"Whether Morris is deconstructing her failed attempts at finding satisfying work, struggling with rocky family relationships or experiencing a culinary failure, she adroitly blends the ingredients of humor and self-reflection."
A refreshing take on growing up and coming to terms with the joys and travails of family, career and navigating the kitchen. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"A nimble story about how one man's revolutionary ideas changed the way we eat."
Former country music singer/songwriter and newly minted geography doctorate student Carlisle unearths the secret history of a rogue posse of organic farmers operating deep in rural Montana. Read full book review >

DIRTY CHICK by Antonia Murphy
Released: Jan. 22, 2015

"Warm, funny and touching."
An "artsy San Francisco dilettante" tells the story of how she traded her urban existence for a life of "chasing cows…and executing chickens" in rural New Zealand. Read full book review >
TASTY by John McQuaid
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"McQuaid is an enthusiastic writer undisturbed by dead ends, and he provides an entertaining exploration of 'the mystery at the heart of flavor,' which 'has never truly been cracked.'"
"Pleasure is never very far from aversion; this is a feature of our anatomy and behavior. In the brain, the two closely overlap." So writes Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist McQuaid (Path of Destruction: The Devastation of New Orleans and the Coming Age of Superstorms, 2006, etc.) in this provocative investigatory foray into the nature of taste.Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Worth a look for those who enjoy self-help books focused on healthy lifestyles."
Holistic health counselor and co-star of the award-winning documentary Super Size Me, Jamieson (Vegan Cooking for Dummies, 2010, etc.) tackles the age-old question of what women really want.Read full book review >
THE MODERN SAVAGE by James E. McWilliams
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"While McWilliams offers convincing arguments for animal rights, they are undermined by the extensive quotes, which become tiresome and offer little useful context."
McWilliams (History/Texas State Univ.; The Pecan: A History of America's Native Nut, 2013, etc.) takes issue with the locavore movement, which preaches compassionate care of farm animals on nonindustrial farms but slaughters those animals in the end.Read full book review >
A Legacy of Sephardic, Mediterranean and American Recipes by Rachel Almeleh
Released: Dec. 30, 2014

"An inviting collection of Sephardic and Mediterranean recipes."
Almeleh's cookbook offers a cornucopia of recipes from Sephardic and other cuisines. Read full book review >
THEY EAT HORSES, DON'T THEY? by Piu Marie Eatwell
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"Entertaining mini-essays that debunk common idealized conceptions of the French."
In this debut, Eatwell pulls back the veil on France and French culture, exposing the truth behind 45 myths that have swirled around the French for ages. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"For readers with a strong interest in environmental and public health and food safety policy, this may be one of the most important books of the year."
A thorough examination of industrial chemicals in our food chain by an acclaimed French journalist and documentary filmmaker. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >