A SQUARE MEAL by Andrew Coe
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A highly readable, illuminating look at the many ramifications of feeding the hungry in hard times."
A history of the struggle to put food on American tables during the Great Depression. Read full book review >
TRUFFLE BOY by Ian Purkayastha
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"An informative and charming food and travel memoir."
A 20-something's account of how he became a leading importer of truffles and other exotic specialty foods for some of America's most elite restaurants. Read full book review >

PANCAKES IN PARIS by Craig Carlson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A light, entertaining story of how a man turned his pipe dream into a profitable, highly respected business."
How the author created the ultimate American diner experience in Paris. Read full book review >
SUPER SUSHI RAMEN EXPRESS by Michael Booth
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"While some readers may wish for deeper explorations of some of Booth's subjects, he covers the current state of Japanese cuisine with humor and intelligence."
A British food and travel writer takes his wife, two young sons, and a bubbly brand of humor to Japan in hopes of examining the food culture and losing a few of the pounds he has picked up living and cooking in Paris. Read full book review >
GENERATION CHEF by Karen Stabiner
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A thoughtfully observed study of what it takes to open a successful restaurant in the most competitive marketplace in the world."
Journalist and narrative nonfiction author Stabiner (Getting In, 2010, etc.) closely tracks a talented, ambitious chef as he opens his first restaurant in New York. Read full book review >

MODIFIED by Caitlin Shetterly
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"The message that our planet is saturated with chemical toxins comes through clearly, but the health case against GMOs is not persuasive."
A journalist on a mission to expose the dangers of genetically modified organisms tells nearly as much about her personal life as about the issue bothering her. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"On the B-list, as showbiz memoirs go, but entertaining enough."
Longtime agent/manager Gordon, whose clients and confidants have ranged from Teddy Pendergrass to Roger Vergé, tells all. Read full book review >
TEN RESTAURANTS THAT CHANGED AMERICA by Paul Freedman
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"Culinary historians, those besotted with food culture, and curious general readers will all find something of value in this well-researched, entertaining social and cultural history."
A robust historical trek through America's restaurant cuisine over three centuries. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 2016

"An insightful book that should be of interest to anyone who eats food, animal or not."
Unsentimental study of the dangers in how meat is produced and distributed around the world, particularly in the United States. Read full book review >
RAY & JOAN by Lisa Napoli
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A book characterized by deep research and a seamless weaving together of the details of different lives."
A dual biography of the man who made McDonald's ubiquitous and his third wife, who, after his death, spent the last two decades of her life becoming one of most generous philanthropists in American history. Read full book review >
DELANCEY by Molly Wizenberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 6, 2024

"A pleasantly rendered if not earth-shattering reality check for anyone with restaurant-owning envy."
A popular food blogger and her husband open a Seattle pizzeria, testing the limits of their marriage in the process. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >