Food & Cooking Book Reviews

TEN RESTAURANTS THAT CHANGED AMERICA by Paul Freedman
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"Culinary historians, those besotted with food culture, and curious general readers will all find something of value in this well-researched, entertaining social and cultural history."
A robust historical trek through America's restaurant cuisine over three centuries. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 2016

"An insightful book that should be of interest to anyone who eats food, animal or not."
Unsentimental study of the dangers in how meat is produced and distributed around the world, particularly in the United States. Read full book review >

THE ESSENTIAL OYSTER by Rowan Jacobsen
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Jacobsen may leave noncoastal readers drooling with jealousy, but vicarious oyster slurping is better than none."
This verbally and visually succulent book covers 99 types of oysters, most from the shores of North America. Read full book review >
FOOD CITY by Joy Santlofer
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Rich, impeccably researched urban history with plenty of fun fodder for foodies."
A comprehensive history of New York City's food industry, from the late chair of New York University's Food Studies Program. Read full book review >
RAY & JOAN by Lisa Napoli
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A book characterized by deep research and a seamless weaving together of the details of different lives."
A dual biography of the man who made McDonald's ubiquitous and his third wife, who, after his death, spent the last two decades of her life becoming one of most generous philanthropists in American history. Read full book review >

Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >