Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Full of finely sifted detail but uneven."
Actor and performance artist Kotin bravely reveals just how powerful sugar addiction can be. Read full book review >
THE JOY OF REAL FOOD by Rowena Jayne
Released: Feb. 4, 2015

"An often engaging book that offers original ways to bring variety to daily meal preparation—even for readers who aren't ready to commit to a raw-food, vegan lifestyle."
This brightly illustrated, eclectic compilation of vegan recipes urges readers to find joy by changing unhealthful culinary habits. Read full book review >

A Legacy of Sephardic, Mediterranean and American Recipes by Rachel Almeleh
Released: Dec. 30, 2014

"An inviting collection of Sephardic and Mediterranean recipes."
Almeleh's cookbook offers a cornucopia of recipes from Sephardic and other cuisines. Read full book review >
FIRST BITE by Bee Wilson
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"With generous measures of grounded wisdom and solid research findings, the book should attract and possibly inspire broad groups of readers struggling with eating-related issues; for others, it may be of less interest."
An exploration of the notion that we can change our early food habits. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An enjoyable read for wine connoisseurs and neophytes alike."
The events and characters behind a 2005 Napa fire that caused the greatest destruction of wine in history: 4.5 million bottles worth more than $250 million. Read full book review >

Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"Readers wishing for a little more about food and a little less about nationalism may want to look elsewhere, but Raviv delivers an academic yet mostly accessible work of culinary anthropology."
What's in a falafel? By the lights of food-studies and nutrition adjunct professor Raviv, it's not just chickpeas and pita bread, but also identity. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A well-researched look into yet another global market undergoing significant growth due to Chinese businesses and consumers."
Wine Spectator contributing editor Mustacich offers an in-depth account of the cultural and business tensions related to China's growing desire for fine wines. Read full book review >
FED, WHITE, AND BLUE by Simon Majumdar
Released: April 7, 2015

"Filled with loving portraits of quirky characters, Majumdar's series of vignettes is a candid and endearing snapshot of not only American food culture, but America itself."
A food writer's cross-country search for what it means to be an American. Read full book review >
GRAIN OF TRUTH by Stephen Yafa
Released: May 12, 2015

"An appealingly complex narrative of a successful quest, with recipes for the home baker."
Playwright and screenwriter Yafa (Cotton: The Biography of a Revolutionary Fiber, 2004) debunks the claim by "the anti-gluten medical contingent" that wheat is unhealthy because it contains gluten, a protein that supposedly contributes to "obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, dementia and more."Read full book review >
THE MAD FEAST by Matthew Gavin Frank
Released: Nov. 9, 2015

"Although Frank's riffs occasionally recall Gertrude Stein's dizzyingly obscure Tender Buttons, overall, he's produced a surprising, entertaining look at what Americans eat and why."
A journey in search of America's tastes. Read full book review >
Salt & Pepper Cooking by James Haller
Released: Nov. 15, 2015

"Flavorful serving of hilarious, poignant memories that will leave readers wanting seconds."
With these funny stories, an award-winning chef reflects on the formative roles of food, family, and friendship in his life. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Less comprehensive and more impressionistic than Hasia Diner's Hungering for America (2002), but a nice, tasty nosh all the same."
A pleasing exercise in culinary and cultural history, evoking some favorite New York-centric comfort foods. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >