Food & Cooking Book Reviews

A Legacy of Sephardic, Mediterranean and American Recipes by Rachel Almeleh
Released: Dec. 30, 2014

"An inviting collection of Sephardic and Mediterranean recipes."
Almeleh's cookbook offers a cornucopia of recipes from Sephardic and other cuisines. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"An intelligently argued study of our country's 'passionate connection to drinking.'"
A distinguished biographer and cultural historian offers a fascinating look at the place and function of alcohol throughout American history. Read full book review >

RICE, NOODLE, FISH by Matt Goulding
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"A food connoisseur expertly unravels the intricate dance surrounding food in Japan."
A gourmand's tour through Japan. Read full book review >
Released: March 24, 2015

"Engaging, precise baking guide that will have readers heading for the kitchen with enthusiasm and confidence."
A tasty treat of practical cookie making, historical cookie-mold information, and a wide range of recipes, all served with appetizing sides of baking history and great photographs. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A disarmingly candid look at the highs, lows, and true grit of a culinary star."
From the acclaimed first female Iron Chef, a heartfelt memoir of a loving family, a passion for food, and the challenges of career and personal life. Read full book review >

EATING WORDS by Sandra M. Gilbert
Released: Oct. 26, 2015

"Useful as a textbook, the volume is a rewarding read for anyone who eats, cooks, or muses about food."
A literary feast for foodies. Read full book review >
HOW TO COOK A MOOSE by Kate Christensen
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"A warmly engaging culinary memoir."
An award-winning novelist's account of the unexpected fulfillment she found in New England, living, loving, cooking, and eating "at the end of the world." Read full book review >
DARE TO PAIR by Julie Pech
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A useful, enjoyable read about the restrained debauchery of consuming chocolate with the fruit of the vine."
A concise guide to the art of pairing chocolate dishes with various types of wines. Read full book review >
CHILLED by Tom Jackson
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"There's much to wonder at in Jackson's captivating book."
The lively history of refrigeration from British science writer Jackson (Mathematics: An Illustrated History of Numbers, 2012, etc.).Read full book review >
DRIVING HUNGRY by Layne Mosler
Released: July 14, 2015

"Mosler's lively and accessible writing style joyfully captures the satisfaction gained by trusting your instincts and seeking out new places, food, and people."
Building on the success of her blog, Taxi Gourmet, Mosler recounts the story of her transcontinental search for a vocation, which propelled the author into dancing in tango clubs in Buenos Aires, becoming a cab driver in New York City, and falling in love with the city of Berlin. Read full book review >
THE DORITO EFFECT by Mark Schatzker
Released: May 5, 2015

"After reading this engaging book, readers may wonder with every bite of food if what they are tasting is real."
Canadian food writer Schatzker (Steak: One Man's Search for the World's Tastiest Piece of Beef, 2010) shows how the manipulation of food has led to our taste buds developing a "warped" relationship "with the fuel our bodies require, food."Read full book review >
BOURBON EMPIRE by Reid Mitenbuler
Released: May 12, 2015

"An illuminating, well-paced narrative that will interest students and imbibers of the wee drap, American-style."
"America was astonishingly drunk." So concluded just about every visitor to these shores in the early days of the republic. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >