AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY TOWARD COMMUNIST CHINA by Foster Rhea Dulles

AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY TOWARD COMMUNIST CHINA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In the process of delineating U.S. foreign policy toward China, Dulles chisels away at textbook myths and the truisms peddled by a generation of China experts. ""Our policies toward China have not been so highminded. . . . America's historical interest in China has been primarily in trade and commerce rather than in the welfare of the Chinese people."" The old wives' tale of China as Soviet puppet is jabbed at, and of course the Open Door policy is unmasked. After junking these complacent misconceptions Dulles creates some of his own. Postwar policy is reviewed as if misinformed prejudice and the ubiquitous China Lobby held the keys to U.S. executive chambers. McCarthy with his ""hysterical appeals to passion"" joins hands with Neanderthal congressmen and diplomats to push through a policy of boycott and brinkmanship toward subversive China. With impartiality China, too, is upbraided for making such hysteria reasonable through its menacing noises against ""imperialism"" and its hostility to U.S. aims in Asia. Histrionics and diplomacy are taken at face value and little attempt is made to seek out the real interests motivating both sides; the wider scope of Realpolitik confrontation is bypassed except for specific issues like Korea and Quemoy-Matsu.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1972
Publisher: T. Y. Crowell