THAT CALLAHAN SPUNK by Francis Ames

THAT CALLAHAN SPUNK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This story of a New England family's first year as homesteaders in the Montana badlands at the turn of the century is told by the young son. Once the reader gets past the unsophisticated, guileless tone of the narrative, this series of vignettes-- killin' my first coyote, ropin' my first calf, survivin' my first mistakes in a whoppin' blizzard--becomes an affecting story of the fortitude and innocence of pioneers who lived not so long ago in our distant past. It is deficient in philosophical vibrations and long on ""hoss-sense,"" which means that it may not be for those who have attained their age of reason. But for others who are studying the westward expansion in the early part of this century and would like some simple, first-hand knowledge of what it was like (probably most schoolboys under seventeen and adults who would like to spend a nostalgic penny) this must be the book.

Pub Date: Oct. 15th, 1965
Publisher: Doubleday