JUSTICE HOLMES, NATURAL LAW AND THE SUPREME COURT by Francis Biddle

JUSTICE HOLMES, NATURAL LAW AND THE SUPREME COURT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The former Attorney General of the U.S. (see report on his autobiography, A Casual Past, August publication by Doubleday- p. 523, June 15th issue) delivered these three lectures on his one-time chief, Justice Holmes. Frankly they add little to what the already interested know of Holmes. The first lecture uses the familiar letters and speeches as a basis for an analysis of his philosophy... The second deals with the battle that arose after his death when he was charged by the Notre Dame Law School for denying the need or existence of Natural Law. Natural Law vs Positive Law has been debated back to the Greek philosophers. The skeptic and the believer will continue the debate ad infinitum... The third lecture on how Judges approach difficult problems involving constitutional interpretations is not very satisfactory-and understandably so. This was evidenced at the meeting of the great legal minds at Harvard Law School in 1955. All dealt with this problem- and produced no satisfactory answer, for each Judge saw it in accordance with his own spirit. And so Francis Biddle approaches Justice Holmes' approach. Specialized market.

Publisher: Macmillan