THE VOYAGE OF THE SIERRA SAGRADA: Across The Atlantic In A Canoe by Francis Brenton

THE VOYAGE OF THE SIERRA SAGRADA: Across The Atlantic In A Canoe

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KIRKUS REVIEW

There's something disarmingly kooky about the voyages of Mr. Brenton, an adventurer of no little flair. The enterprises here -- a dugout canoe journey from Colombia to Chicago (of all places), a voyage in a like craft to Africa arid an aborted balloon ascension, -- have elements of The Voyages of Dr. Do-little and The Wizard of Oz. Certainly Mr. Brenton's practices and theories (like his experiments with humidity) smack of the good Doctor's more halcyon in investigations. The first voyage across the Caribbean and up the Mississippi to deliver two canoes to the Field Museum in Chicago (they had ordered only one) was tame compared to what was to follow. Bouncing across the Atlantic With occasional help from baffled crews of a German and a Russian ship, with the hull of the dugout sprouting mushrooms, food running low, Brenton at last reached West Africa, prepared to launch a balloon for a flight back to America. But Brenton was thrown from the balloon in an abrupt levitation and the Spanish Air Force was forced to shoot it down. Needless to say, the code name for the project ""Low Altitude Flying Feat"" is LAFF, but Mr. Brenton is for real.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1969
Publisher: Regnery