RAYMOND OF THE TIMES by Francis Brown

RAYMOND OF THE TIMES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A hefty and fact filled biography of Henry Jarvis Raymond, founder of The New York Times, this is also an excursion into the confused, often bitter politics of the decade and a half preceding the Civil War, in which Raymond, a free-soil Whig, friend and supporter of Clay and Seward, took active and important part. Raymond, an up-state New Yorker, educated at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary and the University of Vermont, started off his career as a 20 year old boy when he became Horace Greeley's assistant on the weekly New Yorker, went on with him to the Tribune then switched to the Morning Courter and New York Enquirer, and finally, in 1851, founded the paper that was to become the most powerful in the country. An excellent biography for scholarly purposes, this may be a bit too heavy for popular sales.

Pub Date: Aug. 13th, 1951
Publisher: Norton