SELECTED LETTERS OF ALBERT JAY NOCK by Francis J.-Ed. Nock

SELECTED LETTERS OF ALBERT JAY NOCK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A. J. Nock -- over a writing period of twenty years -- made signal contribution to the literary era he compassed. Editor of The Freeman, contributor to early American Magazine, Scribner's, Atlantic, etc., book reviewer, authority on music, he also wrote several full length books, some unsuccessful novels, and two part-autobiographies, Memoirs of a Superfluous Man and A Journal of These Days. Perhaps the best reading of all his books is his delightful Journey into Rabelais's France. Readers who remember his work (he died in 1945) may turn with a certain amount of interest and curiosity to this careful selection of his letters, prepared by his son. They are- for this reader- uneven in interest, and, if the autobiographical writings are fresh in mind, contribute comparatively little that is new. But they do throw light on some of his thinking and points of view, they suggest, the breadth of his interests, the sharpness of his perception, the wide range of friends and acquaintances, and some indication of a definite growth away from rather cynical intolerances to a broader gauged understanding. At best, however, the appeal is sharply limited to people in the literary know. Possibly the section of widest general interest is the brief ""recollection"" contributed by his friend, Ruth Robinson.

Pub Date: July 16th, 1962
Publisher: Caxton