THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG by Frank A. Haskell

THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This eye-witness account of the Battle of Gettysburg, one of the outstanding factual reports in Civil War literature, has long been consulted by historians; this book, superbly edited by Bruce Catton, brings the document within reach of the general public. Haskell, a Vermonter born, graduate of Dartmouth, was practising law in Madison, Wisc., when the War started. Enlisting almost at once for the North he made a name for himself with the ""Iron Brigade"" of the Army of the Potomac and was an aid to its commander, General Gibbon; at Gettysburg, where he was badly wounded, he distinguished himself for daring and leadership. His account of the battle written a few weeks afterwards has never been surpassed, not merely because he himself fought in the three-day struggle and saw it with a soldier's eye, but also because he was an excellent reporter and could write clear and intelligent English. History has corrected the few inaccuracies of the report; the account itself, particularly that of Pickett's Charge, stands as one of the definitive records of the War. Edited and annotated by an authority on the subject, the book is a ""must"" for all public, college and historical libraries and private Civil War collections. Historians and students of the conflict will welcome it and it may also appeal to the general reader who is tired of fictional accounts of the great battle.

Pub Date: April 10th, 1958
ISBN: 1153655446
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin