TALES OF A WAYWARD INN by Frank Case
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TALES OF A WAYWARD INN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is a ""Must Book"" for a definite market, but it is a market so readily defined that it does not rank as a ""Must Book"" for the general trade. First, it is a sure sale for all habituÉes of the famous Algonquin Hotel in New York, and that includes a fair number of the dramatic and literary professions, most of whom, at one time or another, have stayed, or dined, or wanted to stay or dine, at the Algonquin. Next, it will appeal to all of those who like to look on while the lions are fed -- collectors of celebrities, and those who like to feel on the inside. For this is the life story of the owner of the Algonquin. It is informal, with no pretense to being literature -- a bit jagged in manner and spotty in interest, but all in all, a log book of the Algonquin and its owner. From a railroad ticket office in a Buffalo hotel lobby, to the position of arbiter of fates -- literary and dramatic, -- via Jersey City and points east. The book is more a collection of grand yarns about the spotlight, amusing, human interest stories, et al. Selections from a file of letters at the close give sidelights on the unique place the hotel holds in the hearts of its guests. A probable best seller in the East -- and a book for a chosen market elsewhere. It is sure of a good break in the press.

Pub Date: Nov. 17th, 1938
Publisher: Stokes