THE COTTON ROAD by Frank Feuille

THE COTTON ROAD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Frank Feuille has given an unfamiliar side issue of the Civil War an unexpected wild west flavor in this blood and thunder novel about those who opened up a road across the Texas wilderness in order to reach an export site for cotton. The tale and the characters are simple and unsophisticated; there are the good and the bad, heroes and villains and the heroine is very beautiful. But the narrative of the thousand mile journey to a free port on the Mexican border is filled with interest; the travellers include Texans desperate to preserve the life-blood of the south, the cotton industry, and also an Englishman seeking raw materials for his idle textile mills in England. The anguish of the journey, the misery of battling the primitive landscape and human enemies are well depicted. Memorable is a happy arrival for the exhausted party at the frontier town of Richmond, Texas, where kindliness and hospitality bring true civilization to a rare high. This book sheds light on a little known chapter of history; it is a pleasant and readable if somewhat juvenile adventure.

Pub Date: Oct. 20th, 1954
Publisher: Morrow