SINCE SILENT SPRING by Frank Jr. Graham

SINCE SILENT SPRING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The late Rachel Carson's Silent Spring appeared in 1962, and Mr. Graham provides a welcome review of what has and has not been accomplished in pesticide control since then. After a graceful tribute to Miss Carson and a review of the astonishing controversy following the book's publication, the author highlights major set-to's among ecologists, politicians and industry. He then points out continuing hazards in the use of chemicals in frightening detail -- both in the U.S. and abroad -- and answers broadsides from the pesticide industry and their acolytes in a thoroughly convincing presentation. But this is not merely an angry retort. Conservationists (from alarmed scientists to simply citizens who don't want to be sprayed) are grouping for action particularly in the courts. Mr. Graham cheers the advent and militant career of the Environmental Defense Fund (with 100 scientists warming up in the bullpen) and he tells you where to send contributions. There is a run down of alternate methods of pest control (Miss Carson did not ban all chemicals) and an appendix with Shirley Briggs' guide to safe pesticides, a table of trade names with chemical derivations, and a summary of Federal Registration Requirements. For all admirers of Miss Carson's work and for those in the front lines of the conservation ""army"" -- no longer silent.

Pub Date: Feb. 26th, 1969
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin