THERE'S A SPOT IN MY HEART by Frank Leslie

THERE'S A SPOT IN MY HEART

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Current followup in the recent revival of ancestor worship, this is a Manhattan memoir of the West '70's -- back in the early 1900's. Predicated on a ""pink schizophrenic"" collection of progenitors, the chronicle of feuds, within the family circle and without, encompass formative years with maternal relatives. There was a Grandfather whose commando sallies rout all enemies; a Grandmother defeated by nothing, not even a deliberately resistant cook; Uncle George, nominee of the anti-progress league and bachelor extra-ordinary; a Mother whose public predicaments worsted cultivated phlegmatics- these provide, in thinly veiled fiction form, a high threshold of hyperbole. In the Irish acrobatics of grief, anguish and emotionalism, and in a period decor of delirious detail, this sustains ineffable hysteria of high color recall, enhanced by the unworldly decorations of Fred. E. Banbery. Item for temps perdu audience.

Pub Date: May 13th, 1947
Publisher: Simon & Schuster