THE REVOLT OF THE MIND by

THE REVOLT OF THE MIND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Historically this is an extension of Meray's previous book Thirteen Days That Shook the Kremlin (P. 315). Here ""A Case History of Intellectual Resistance Behind the Iron Curtain"", follows the position of Hungarian writers under the Communist control of their country to the point of the revolution of October, 1956. The enforcement of Soviet culture in all areas of life and writing, the voluntary submission to the homogeneous and carefully integrated ideology propounded by the Muscovites, the ""Old Fighters"" and the new generation of Hungarian youth, and the belief in the Party's ""directed inspiration"" are described together with the coming of a new enlightenment from released prisoners and the political simmerings in which the cultural elements added their part. And with the division among the Communist writers, begun in 1953, comes the awareness of how the Hungarians had been duped by large and small lies -- particularly in the ""unprecedented crimes"" commited in the Rajk affair-; of the advent of further terror and of the necessity for open revolt. A documented indictment by two who were not only Communists but Stalinists, this underlines and footnotes the Thirteen Days and states its case for intellectual freedom. In detail.

Pub Date: Jan. 14th, 1959
Publisher: Praeger