AMERICA'S PRAIRIES by Frank Staub

AMERICA'S PRAIRIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Beginning with a survey of grasslands worldwide, a map showing the extent of the three types (tallgrass, mixed, and shortgrass) that make up the North American prairie, and a clear explanation of their differing characteristics, Staub answers precisely the questions raised by Dvorak's beautiful photo introduction (above). With remarkably little overlap, the two books are complementary in the best sense; though Staub's color photos aren't as outstanding, they cover such additional subjects as sod houses, the plow that was invented to cut through dense roots, barbed wire, and the burning pattern of a grass fire. Meanwhile, the author presents interrelated changes in the habitat since westward expansion: the impact on native species; the effect of heavy grazing on different grasses; the dust bowl; etc. An excellent presentation, both broader and deeper than Dvorak's (which, however, can be used with younger children); both are valuable contributions. Glossary; index.

Pub Date: Feb. 4th, 1994
Page count: 48pp
Publisher: Carolrhoda