THE WRIGHT BROTHERS by Fred C. Kelly
Kirkus Star

THE WRIGHT BROTHERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The authorized biography of our unostentatious inventors, whose pioneering in heavier than air flying machines aroused only American incredulity, and earned them the title of ""Flyers or Liars"". It is entertaining, as well as instructive, reading, for the picture of Fred and Orville, as boys, with their mechanical aptitudes, their curiosity and original thinking, represents so large a section of American boyhood, and the ensuing pursuit of their dream of man's ability to fly embodies so thoroughly the ""If at first you don't succeed"" precept. From their bicycle business, when they were grown, to their earliest experiments and discoveries, at Kitty Hawk, to their growing list of problems to be conquered, and the unexcited acceptance of their flights at the Huffman pasture, their recognition in Europe before the United States was willing to admit their successful conclusion of long years of trial and error, this makes excellent reading of early aviation history, for man or boy. The emphasis necessary is placed on the long hours of laboratory work, of kite, glider and wind tunnel contributions, of modesty that befits the first birdmen, of the business complications, of the training of pilots, of uncomfortable relations with the U.S. Army. A sympathetic, well-rounded ploture of the man who first flew, forty years ago.

Pub Date: May 13th, 1943
Publisher: Harcourt Brace