U.S. POLICY AND THE SECURITY OF ASIA by Fred Greene

U.S. POLICY AND THE SECURITY OF ASIA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The century-and-a-half tradition of American involvement in Asian affairs continues unabated. This book seeks to assess the range of U.S. security interests in Asia and their status as ""vital"" points. Greene is a professor of political science and the author of a textbook on the dynamics of international relations; he occupies a moderate position here within the prevaling consensus that the U.S. should retain its ""presence"" in Asia. The book is less polemical and ideological than it is analytic and open-ended. Canvassing the postwar period and exhaustively poking around all the places that have occupied, and often preoccupied, American policymakers, it traces the genesis and expansion of America's recent roles in Asia, and the various forms these activities have taken. Greene expresses reservations about the skein of treaty involvements used by the U.S. to establish its military-juridical presence in the era. He concludes that the U.S. will have to make choices (e.g. between Pakistan and India) and learn to adulterate its military push by an increased use of political approaches. Despite a rather heavy-handed style, the book is a good addition to Asian affairs collections because of its comprehensiveness and temperate approach.

Pub Date: Feb. 15th, 1967
Publisher: McGraw-Hill