THE PREMATURE DEATH OF PROTESTANTISM by Fred J. Denbeaux

THE PREMATURE DEATH OF PROTESTANTISM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

If Protestantism is to survive, Professor Denbeaux of Wellesley believes, it must overcome its ""eternal temptation to express itself through polemics."" In particular, it must change its ways of decrying man's creativity and culture. Protestantism has fallen upon vulgar ways. Instead of producing poets, it sets up coffeehouses for folk-singers. Instead of producing poets, it sets up coffeehouses for fold-singers. But Protestants are now becoming a minority; Protestant man has lost his prestige. He must now give up his traditional withdrawal from the cultural scene, and participate freely in creative work, as his response to God's creativity, and in the faith that God's grace enables him to sin and yet survive. Much of the argument indicates the author's indebtedness to the thought of Reinhold Niebuhr, to whom the book is dedicated. The author is given to cryptic generalization--e.g., ""There is little difference, with on exception, between the Old and the New Testaments""--whose implications are left unexplained. And in spite of his disclaimer of polemic, the polemic tone seems to pervade the argument.

Pub Date: Oct. 17th, 1967
Publisher: Lippincott