DECISIONS by Freda Bright

DECISIONS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

In options (1983) a career-woman heroine, torn between domesticity and execmomentum, opted for Home; here Dasha Croy, crack corporation lawyer, is facing a similarly agonizing either-or. Dasha has loved passionately--and still loves--husband Jordan, father of their teenagers Robin and Geoffrey. But Dasha, ""one of the ten top litigators of Wall Street,"" also has a red-hot career at Slater Blaney and a sizzling affair with senior partner Frank Hunicutt. And then, while she's awaiting a Supreme Court decision on one of her Slater Blaney cases, Dasha is presented with an ultimatum from Jordan: leave Slater Blaney--or me! So. . . what to do? Well, before a decision is reached, flashbacks fill in her road to the top: girlhood grooming for husband-catching, with intellectual pursuits reserved for her brother Alexander, now a D.C. journalist; love for Jordan, following him into law at Seneca College (to her embarrassment Dasha finds that she has the natural knack Jordan seems to lack); the arrival of children; happy days baking cookies while Jordan begins a small-potatos storefront career in Manhattan; empty-nest syndrome for Dasha, a completed law degree with honors, and her rise through the WASP meritocracy of Slater Blaney, where senior partners ""divide up the universe with Darth Vader""--and where married lover Frank is a like-minded striver, after ""risk-taking glory."" Back in the present, then, Dasha nervously awaits the Supreme decision--with a personal angle: the villain suing her client-network is a Moon-like guru whose victims include brother Alex's son. And, while Jordan fumes, daughter Robin takes off for concert-pianist schooling and son Geoffrey sulks. . . so Dasha muses over marriage. Do people outgrow each other? Stay tuned. Nothing new, but a solid slab of career-woman soap--with a lather of sharp in-talk, posh environs, a sprinkling of convincing court performance excerpts, and First Class accommodations all the way.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1984
Publisher: St. Martin's