14 AFRICANS VS. ONE AMERICAN by Frederic Fox

14 AFRICANS VS. ONE AMERICAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Writing School at which Frederic Fox teaches journalism to students from the eight English speaking nations which constitute Black Africa, is located in Northern Rhodesia. Established by the All-African Church Conference, the school attempts to train Africans to write for Africans: ""Black editors were needed for Church newspapers, magazines, radio stations, school curriculums, hymnals, and books on every subject from Citizenship to Marriage, Business to Labor, Science to Art"". Fox has a very interesting concept here. He has let 14 of his students be seen- ""be seen"" via their own writings (assigned autobiographies, poetry, prose pieces, criticisms) and a running commentary consisting of his own experiences, impressions, etc., toward each. All fourteen are urbanized, middle-class, men, from Tanganyika, Ghana, Nigeria, Northern Rhodesia, Liberia, Nyasaland, and Kenya. They range in age from 22-35; they're married and single, neither ""too bright or too dumb"". What we have, then, is a kind of composite picture of not the leaders, but the future spokesmen of Africa -- what they laugh at; what they think of the European; what they feel about their new, emerging importance; even what they dream about. The prose of the 14 Africans is turgid and self-concious but these very characteristics are significant. Some of Fox's views are quite fresh and insightful, increasingly difficult as more, and more and still more light is shone on the subject.

Pub Date: Jan. 21st, 1962
Publisher: Macmillan