LOVE IN THE TIME OF APARTHEID by Frederic Hunter

LOVE IN THE TIME OF APARTHEID

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A quasi-political thriller and love story set in 1960s Africa.

Gat, aka Adriaan Gautier, has been given instructions by his Belgian superiors in the Congo: “disappear.” With $2,000 American and a forged passport, he flees to South Africa to reinvent himself and shrug off the demons that haunt him from his soldiering in Prime Minster Patrice Lumumba’s new Congo. The lonely Gat eyes an 18-year-old beauty from an Afrikaner and English family, and he begins a promising courtship. But Petra is the daughter of a racist Cape Town police colonel, and Gat abhors apartheid. Gat, who is guilt-ridden and fighting nightmares of murder, helps Pet see beyond her family’s prejudices. When a black woman is struck by a car, however, Pet’s rushed conversion to fervent good Samaritan-ism may be a bit too convenient. The lovers skip town and marry, but Pet’s enraged father won’t let them go easily. This novel’s hodgepodge of subplots—hiding spies, thwarted romance, systemic racism—ultimately coalesces. Hunter (The Girl Ran Away, 2014, etc.), a former Africa Correspondent of the Christian Science Monitor, ably captures South Africa. Plain prose and dialogue keep the pace motoring, and the simply told espionage storyline may appeal to Ian Fleming fans. There is daring, intrigue, and an ugly current of racism, but make no mistake, this is a love story at its core.

Austere and well-told; an unlikely mix of espionage, apartheid, and love on the run.

Pub Date: Nov. 30th, 2016
ISBN: 978-1-57962-444-6
Page count: 312pp
Publisher: Permanent Press
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15th, 2016




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