AIDAN AND THE STROLLING PLAYERS by Frederick Grice

AIDAN AND THE STROLLING PLAYERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Strolling players in feudal England provide an unusual theme. Aidan, a young lad, escapes from a tyrannical uncle, and on the road befriends Mr. Bullivan, an actor, who offers him membership in his company. The success of a play in those days was measured by the ability of the players to override the noise and heckling from the audience. By pretending to bleed while playing a soldier, Aidan establishes his first success. When one of the actors turns out to be a thief, Mr. Bullivan disbands his company and Aidan and his new friend Jeremy take to the roads. Many adventures befall them. They join a town fair with a giant and a dwarf who pretends to eat stones; they so entrance a magistrate with their ability that he gives them pardon for performing without a license; and they finally join a successful company in London. When his uncle dies Aidan becomes heir to his estate and discovers for the first time that his father was an actor. Although this long-buried profession and its era are revived, here the story is only loosely held together with some isolated adventures capturing our interest.

Pub Date: Jan. 5th, 1960
Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce